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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 79 13 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 66 6 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 54 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 49 1 Browse Search
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 34 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 33 5 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 23 1 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 23 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 20, 1861., [Electronic resource] 21 1 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 18 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2.. You can also browse the collection for Charles Wilkes or search for Charles Wilkes in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., McClellan organizing the grand Army. (search)
ington of the incident afterward known as the Trent affair [see p. 134]. . . . The capture of the Confederate Commissioners on the high seas under a neutral flag, in flagrant violation of the law of nations,--a violation brutal in its method and useless in its results, most dangerous in its consequences,--was hailed by public opinion as a splendid victory for the Stars and Stripes. . . . Two men at Washington comprehended from the first the danger to their country of the inconsiderate act of Wilkes: these were Seward and McClellan. The former, burdened with an immense responsibility, patriotically dissimulated his opinion with extraordinary finesse; he permitted the excitement to spend itself, and, thanks to the slowness of communication with England, gained time enough Seward's letter consenting to the return of the Commissioners bears date of Dee. 2 6, 18 61.--Editors. to extricate his Government at the critical juncture, by enveloping the decision he had succeeded in extorting f
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Captain Wilkes's seizure of Mason and Slidell. (search)
particularly of England and France. When Captain Wilkes first took me into his confidence, and tolaimed the right to board the mail-packet. Captain Wilkes fully expected that I would tender my serv very respectfully, your obedient servant, Charles Wilkes, Captain. To Lieutenant D. M. Fairfax, U. Jacinto, I replied, Your old acquaintance, Captain Wilkes ; whereupon she expressed surprise that hest uproar had subsided, I sent the boat to Captain Wilkes to say that these gentlemen were all on bory stores, which the paymaster's clerk, at Captain Wilkes's order, had already purchased from the stescorted each commissioner to the Rear-Admiral Charles Wilkes. From a photograph. side, and assit on board the San Jacinto and reported to Captain Wilkes that I had not taken the Trent as a prize,character; for everything had been done by Captain Wilkes and his officers to make them feel at homeannot close this narrative without saying that Wilkes was one of our very best officers, a man of st[17 more...]