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ne with so much joy, that women young and old wept freely, while old men waved their hats and tossed them in the air with delight. Tables were spread for us by the roadside, and superintended by some bright-eyed girl, while darkies grinned, and laughed, and skipped about with all the grimaces and antics of young monkeys. Nods of recognition were frequent along the Gum Spring road, for our brigade had been stationed many months in Loudon; and as we approached Leesburgh, I was met by farmer Wilkins, who, in a white felt hat, blue homespun coat, and yellow leather riding-breeches, fell into line, and almost squeezed my fingers off in his warmth and excitement. From him I learned some particulars regarding Yankee rule on the Upper Potomac since our departure, and the recital affected the old man even to tears-Not that I weep for the loss of my sons, said he; but I do cry because I am not young enough to bear arms against the cursed wretches who have been quartered among us so long.
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The draft riots in New York. (search)
me houses at Forty-sixth street and Fifth avenue, which was suppressed by Captain Putnam (Twelfth Infantry), with a loss to the rioters of forty men. The residence of James Gibbon, a relative of Horace Greeley, in Twenty-ninth street, between Seventh and Eighth avenues, was emptied of its contents. Brooks Brothers' clothing store, in Catharine street, was ransacked, until Captain Franklin came to the rescue. Four barricades were erected in Ninth avenue, near Thirty-fifth street, which Captain Wilkins, with the Governor's Island troops, captured and destroyed after a lively fight. My section, of which I had resumed command after it was rescued from Colonel O'Brien, was attacked at Thirty-sixth street and Seventh avenue. I went into battery, but my raw gun detachments worked clumsily, and the mob vanished like smoke into the side streets. As the excitement was intense in that neighborhood, and General Sanford was apprehensive for the safety of the arsenal, I bivouacked where I was,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Kelleysville, March 17th, 1863-Reports of Generals J. E. B. Stuart and Fitz. Lee. (search)
of Company F; Lieutenant R. T. Hubbard, Company G; and First Lieutenant Hall, of Company C, (was twice wounded before he desisted from the charge, and, when retiring, received a third and still more severe wound, and was unable to leave the field). Adjutant H. B. McClellan is also particularly commended for his bravery; Acting Sergeant-Major E. N. Price, Company K; Private Keech, Company I; and Bugler Drilling. Sergeant Betts, of Company C; Privates Young, Company B; Fowler, Company G, and Wilkins, of Company C, died as became brave men, in the front of the charge at the head of the column. In the Second, the commanding officer reports, where so many behaved themselves with so much gallantry he does not like to discriminate. In the First, Captain Jordan, Company C, and Lieutenant Cecil, Company K, (specially commended for reckless daring without a parallel). As coming under my own observation, I particularly noticed Colonel T. L. Rosser, of the Fifth, with his habitual coo
declaring undying fealty to the Union, approving the course of the Legislative and Executive branches of the State Government in responding to the call of the President, disregarding all partisan feeling, and pledging their lives, fortunes, and sacred honor in the defence of the Union, and appointing a Committee of Public Safety. A resolution approving the action of the Philadelphia banks in the prompt offer of money to the Government, was also passed. The meeting was addressed by Judge Wilkins, Thomas M. Marshall, the Hon. P. C. Shannon, Dr. McCook, Ex-Governor Johnston, the Hon. A. W. Loomis, and other prominent citizens of all parties. The speeches elicited great applause.--Tribune, April 16. Governor Yates, of Illinois, issued a proclamation to convene the Legislature at Springfield, on the 23d of April, for the purpose of enacting such laws and adopting such measures as may be deemed necessary upon the following subject, to wit: The more perfect organization and equi
not a man did we see who was well fed and fully clad; but to the credit of the prisoners in Richmond, of all ranks, be it recorded, that, although they have shown heroic fortitude under suffering, and spurning the idea that their Government had forgotten them, have held fast their confidence in the final and speedy success of our cause. In addition to the above statement, we wish to be distinctly understood that the confederate medical officers connected with the hospitals referred to, Surgeons Wilkins, Simmons, and Sobal, and the hospital steward, Hollet, are not in any way, as far as our observation has extended, responsible for the state of things existing there, but on the other hand, we are bound in justice to bear testimony to their kindness and the faithful performance of duties with the limited means at their disposal. The surgeons who signed this statement were, Daniel Meeker, United States Navy; C. T. Liners, Assistant Surgeon Sixth Maine regiment; J. L. Brown, Assistant
e, No. 106 Sudbury street, to inform Captain Howe of what was taking place. Mr. Howe was pushed and hustled, and finally struck upon the head. At this point Officer Wilkins, of Station One, arrived and rendered assistance to the imperilled man. Mr. Wilkins succeeded in getting Mr. Howe away from the crowd, and entered the store oMr. Wilkins succeeded in getting Mr. Howe away from the crowd, and entered the store of Mr. Stearns, on the corner of Prince and Commercial streets, where the blood was washed from his face. The officer then started to walk with Mr. Howe to his lodgings — the Merrimac House — but as soon as they reached the street, the crowd, which had by this time greatly increased in numbers, again set upon Mr. Howe. This time hde to arrest the woman, when a gathering crowd hearing who the officers were, made an assault upon Howe, beating him severely. He was rescued from the mob by officer Wilkins, and carried into a store, corner of Prince and Causeway streets. When it was supposed the crowd had dispersed, they proceeded toward the Merrimac House, whe
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 22: prisoners.-benevolent operations during the War.--readjustment of National affairs.--conclusion. (search)
ty which culminated after a career of two hundred years or more, in what Blackstone declares to be the sum of all wickedness denounced in the Decalogue, namely, treason. Proofs from ten thousand tongues certify and justify the conclusions of a National Senator (Howard), who, while holding in his hand the report of a Committee appointed by the United States Sanitary Commission in May, 1864, This Committee was composed of Doctors Valentine Mott and Edward Delafield, and Gouverneur Morris. Wilkins, of New York, and Doctor Ellerslie Wallace, Hon. John J. Clark Hare, and Rev. Treadwell Walden of Philadelphia. They were appointed by the Commission for ascertaining, by inquiry and investigation, the true physical condition of prisoners recently discharged, by exchange, from confinement at Richmond and elsewhere within the rebel lines; whether they did, in fact, during such confinement, suffer materially for want of food, or from its defective quality, or from other privations or sources
were composed of the whole of the Third Regiment and a battalion of the Fifth Regiment of Missouri Union Volunteers, as follows: Third regiment of Missouri Union Volunteers. Colonel commanding expedition, Franz Siegel. First battalion.--First Artillery Company, designated as Company A--Capt. Backoff; Company A--Capt. Henry Bishop; Company B--Capt. D. Conrath; Company C--Capt. Cramer; Company D--Capt. Zais. Second battalion.--Second Artillery Company, designated as Company E--Capt. Wilkins; Company F--Capt. Hartmann; Company G-Capt. Hackmann; Company H--Capt. J. E. Stroudtmann; Company I--Capt. F. E. Schreiner. regimental staff.--Adjutant. C. Heinricks; Quartermaster, C. E. Stark; Ordnance Officer, F. Koerner. Fifth regiment of Missouri Union Volunteers. Colonel, C. E. Salomon; Lieutenant-Colonel, C. D. Wolff. (As Colonel Salomon was in command at Springfield at last advices, doubtless the battalion was under the charge of Lieutenant-Colonel Wolff, who has sinc
e directed against the right centre of the enemy, which had the effect in a short time of considerably weakening the fire of the rebels at this point. I now formed a chain of skirmishers between our cannon, ordering two of Capt. Essig's pieces from the right to the left wing, and gave my officers and men to understand that it was my intention to gain the height by advancing with my left wing, and taking position on the right flank of the centre of the enemy. At this critical moment Capt. Wilkins, commander of one of our two batteries, declared that he could not advance for want of ammunition. No time was to be lost, as part of our troops were already engaged with the hostile cavalry at the extreme right and left, and as it seemed to me of very doubtful expediency to advance with the remainder without due support of artillery. The moral effect which the hostile cavalry made in our rear could not be denied, although the real danger was not great. The threatening loss of our ent
f company F; Lieutenant R. F. Hubbard, company G; and first Lieutenant Hall, of company C, was twice wounded, before he desisted from the charge, and when retiring, received a third and still more severe wound, and was unable to leave the field. Adjutant H. B. McClellan is also particularly commended for his gallantry. Acting Sergeant-Major, E. W. Price, company K, private Keech, company I, and bugler-drilling Sergeant Betts, of company C; privates Young, company B, Fowler, company G, and Wilkins, company C, died as became brave men, in the front of the charge, at the head of the column. In the Second, the commanding officer reports, where so many behaved themselves with so much gallantry he does not like to discriminate. In the First, Captain Jordan, company C, and Lieutenant Cecil, company K, specially commended for reckless daring, without a parallel. As coming under my own observation, I particularly noticed Colonel T. L. Rosser, of the Fifth, and his habitual coolness an
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