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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 8 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 8 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 4 0 Browse Search
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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 6: fiction I — Brown, Cooper. (search)
cast part of his coat. In 1795, after another visit to New York, he began an unidentified work, apparently speculative but not a romance, to equal in extent Caleb Williams, a book in which Brown saw transcendant merits. In spite of the first ardour which had made him sure he could finish his task in six weeks, he lost faith in ills. It is characteristic of Brown that, while two of his notable romances recall his most vivid personal experience, all four of them wear the colours of Caleb Williams. From Godwin, Brown had his favourite subject, virtue in distress, and his favourite set of characters, a patron and a client. Perhaps he comes nearest to h pure Godwin, but it has a certain spirit of youth and ardour which Godwin lacked. In Arthur Mervyn the hero has to undergo less than the cumulative agony of Caleb Williams. for the simple reason that Brown worked too violently to be able to organize a scheme of circumstances all bearing upon a single victim. At least in the s
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
ett, J. G., 226 Burns, 283 Burr, Aaron, 247 Burr, Rev., Aaron, 65 Burroughs, Edward, 8 Burroughs, John, 271 Burton, R., II, 93 Burton, W. E., 231 Busy-body, the, 117 Busy-body papers, 95, 115 Butler, Samuel, 112, 173, 274 Byles, Mather, 113, 114, 159-160 Byrd, William, 10, 13 Byron, 212, 243, 261, 262, 264, 265, 268, 271, 276, 278, 279, 280, 282, 309 Byron and Byronism in America, 280 n. C Caius Marius, 222 Calavar, 319 Calaynos, 222, 223 n. Caleb Williams, 288, 290 Calef, Robert, 55 Calvert, Sir, George, 4 Calvin, 36, 39, 66, 67, 71, 83 Campaign, 159 Campbell, George, 229 Campbell, Thomas, 183, 282 Candid examination of the neutral claims of great Britain and the colonies, a, 138 Captain Barney's victory over the General monk, 183 Captain John Smith of Virginia, 18 n. Captain Morgan or the Conspiracy Unveiled, 227 Carlyle, 4, 332, 339, 350, 354, 357, 361 Carmen Seculare (Lewis), 151 Cartwright, John,
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Chapter 3: the Philadelphia period (search)
01, made their way across the ocean with a promptness that now seems inexplicable; they represented American literature to England. Mrs. Shel. ley in her novel of The last man founds her whole description of an epidemic, which nearly destroys the human race, on the masterly delineations of the author of Arthur Mervyn. Shelley himself recognized his obligations to Brown; and it is to be remembered that Brown himself was evidently familiar with Godwin's philosophical writings and with Caleb Williams, and that he may have drawn from Mary Wollstonecraft his advanced views as to the rights and education of women, a subject on which his first book, Alcuin, provided the earliest American protest. Undoubtedly his tales furnished a point of transition from Mrs. Radcliffe, of whom he disapproved, to the modern novel of realism, although his immediate influence and, so to speak, his stage properties, can hardly be traced later than the remarkable tale, also by a Philadelphian, called Stanle
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Index. (search)
ter, Elder William, 139. Brook Farm Community, 168, 192. Brown, Brownlee, 264. Brown, Charles Brockden, 51, 69-78, 92, 142, 143. Browning, Elizabeth Barrett, 129. Browning, Robert, 68, 183, 215, 225, 229, 260-262, 265. Bryant, William Cullen, 81, 100-104. Buckingham, Joseph T., 93. Buel, Rev. J. W., 262. Bunker Hill, Battle of, 61, 135. Burns, Robert, 35, 36, 68, 69, 114, 152, 153. Burroughs, John, 264. Byrd, Col., William, 199. Byron, Lord, 277. Cabot, George, 46, 48. Caleb Williams, Godwin's, 72. Cantata, Lanier's, 224. Carlyle, Thomas, 169, 170, 179, 260, 282. Cary, Alice and Phoebe, 241. Chambered Nautilus, Holmes's, 159, 163, 264. Channing, William Ellery, 10, 110, 111, 114-116, 183, 192. Channing, William Ellery, the younger, 177, 264. Chanting the Square Deific, Whitman's, 232. Charlotte Temple, Mrs. Rowson's, 92, 241. Chasles, M. Philarete, 244. Chastellux, Marquis de, 54. Chatham, Lord, 44, 45. Child, Lydia Maria, 125, 126. Choate
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 6: (search)
ere, wife of the notorious William Godwin, and successor to the no less notorious Mary Wollstonecraft. She has come to Paris to sell a romance, of which I have forgotten the title, that her husband has recently written, and thinks as good as Caleb Williams. The booksellers of Paris, I believe, are not of his opinion, and probably they are right, for Mr. Godwin is no longer at the age in which the imagination is capable of such efforts. Miss Williams herself is evidently waning. Her conversatMiss Williams herself is evidently waning. Her conversation is not equal to her reputation, and I suspect never was brilliant; since, as I should think, it must always have been affected. But still she is an uncommon woman, and, except when she gets upon politics, talks sensibly. . . . . After having been successively royalist, republican, and Bonapartist, she finds it impossible, now she has again become Bourbonist, to get along in conversation. . . . . May 6.—I dined to-day with an uncommonly interesting party at Mad. de Stael's. Besides the f
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 14: (search)
ting as if his head had never been filled with anything but geometry. He is now about sixty-five, stout, well-built, and unbroken by age, with a cool, dogged manner, exactly opposite to everything I had imagined of the author of St. Leon and Caleb Williams. He lives on Snowhill, just about where Evelina's vulgar relations lived. His family is supported partly by the labors of his own pen and partly by those of his wife's, but chiefly by the profits of a shop for children's books, which she ke of the town. . . . . . I always came away with regret, because I felt that I had been in the midst of influences which ought to have made me better. I felt no such regret, however, when at last, on the 26th April, I left London. As I bade Mr. Williams farewell, Mr. Samuel Williams, a banker in London, and a member of a well-known Boston family. whose kindness had followed me all over Europe, and turned from his door, I was assured that my face was now finally set to go home. . . . . My j