Browsing named entities in Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for E. P. Williams or search for E. P. Williams in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 4 document sections:

Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 3: strategic Reconnoissances. (search)
rating land force should be sent to secure the guns when silenced by the vessels under his command. General Mitchell, then in command at Port Royal, promptly sent a force under General Brannan, which was landed at a favorable point. The gunboats attacked the battery on the 5th of October, which led to the hasty abandonment of the works and the seizure of them by our troops. The armed steamer Darlington, captured, as the reader will remember, by Commander Rodgers at Fernandina, Lieutenant-Commander Williams, with Company E Forty-seventh Pennsylvania regiment on board, and the Hale, Lieutenant-Commander Snell, ascended the river to Lake Beresford, two hundred and thirty miles, and captured the steamer Morton, one of the best on the river and engaged in the transportation of arms and munitions. General Brannan wrote to the flag-officer: Commander Steedman exhibited a zeal and perseverance in every instance, whether in aiding my forces to effect a landing, the ascent of St. John's riv
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 4: raid of the Confederate ironclads off Charles-Ton.—attack on Fort M'Allister. (search)
pose of escaping to foreign waters. If Commander Worden should be successful against the fort, it was thought that the Nashville might be destroyed, and afterward a railroad bridge lying two miles above the fort. Commander Worden reported his arrival off Ossabaw Bar on the 24th of January, in tow of the James Adger. He crossed the bar at 5 P. M. but had to anchor on account of fog, which also held him fast the following day. The commanding officers of the Seneca, Wissahickon, Dawn, and Williams were called together and instructions given as to the plan of attack on the fort. On the 26th the Montauk anchored just out of range, followed by the other vessels. After dark, Lieutenant-Commander John L. Davis, with two armed boats, went up the river to reconnoitre, and to destroy range marks placed by the enemy. He examined the line of piles driven across the river diagonally below the fort, and found indications that the piles supported torpedoes. At 7 A. M. the Montauk moved to a p
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 7: operations against Charleston. (search)
strously, not in great loss of life, but in the capture of a considerable number of officers and sailors, as well as the loss of several boats. The demand for the surrender of Sumter had informed the enemy, and boats in tow of tugs from the vessels outside of the bar during the whole of the afternoon left little doubt as to an intended attempt. He did not fail, therefore, to put a considerable force into Sumter for the occasion. Commander T. H. Stevens was in command, and Lieutenant-Commander E. P. Williams, Lieutenants Remey, Preston, Higginson, and Ensign Craven, commanded the five divisions of boats. A detachment of marines, under Captain McCawley, formed also a part of the force, numbering in all 400. A request for the loan of some army boats brought the information that General Gillmore also intended making an attack. It was about 10 P. M. before the boats, in tow of a tug, reached the vicinity of Sumter; a sound of musketry, followed by shells from the adjacent forts, an
l, the. 176 Whitehead, the, 177, 181, 183 et seq., 186, 188, 194, 201, 204, 207, 200 et seq. Whiting, Lieutenant-Commander W. D., 128 Whiting, Major-General, 225 et seq. Wilderness, the, 220 et seq., 229 Wiley, Ensign, 237 Williams, Lieutenant-Commander E. P., 70, 138 Williams, the, 84, 129, 145 Winfield Scott, the, U. S. transport, 33 Winona the, 152, 156 Winslow, the, Confederate steamer, 170 Wissahickon, the, 84 et seq., 89. 128, 131, 152 Women oWilliams, the, 84, 129, 145 Winfield Scott, the, U. S. transport, 33 Winona the, 152, 156 Winslow, the, Confederate steamer, 170 Wissahickon, the, 84 et seq., 89. 128, 131, 152 Women of the South, violent feeling shown by, 56, 66 Woodbury, Paymaster, 131 Worden, Commander John L., 83 et seq., 92, 114, 162 (note) Wood, Chief-Engineer, 110 Wood, Ensign, 237 Wood, General, 165 Wood, George H., 62 Woodman, Master's Mate, 213 Woodward, Master Thomas G., 177 Wool, General, 165 Wright, Brigadier-General, H. G., 19, 27; enters Wassaw Sound, 46 et seq.; in St. Andrew's Inlet, 49, 54 Wyalusing, the, 204, 207, 209, 214 Wyandotte, the, U. S. steamer,