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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 14 2 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Prevost, Sir George 1767-1816 (search)
ight on the night of the battle there (see Plattsburg, battles at), was inexplicable. The Rev. Eleazar Williams declared that it was the result of a clever trick arranged by him (Williams), as commaWilliams), as commander of a secret corps of observation, or spies, as they were called in the Western army. Governor Chittenden, of Vermont, restrained the militia of his State from leaving it. A few days before the baMacomb that the militia would cross the lake in spite of the governor. After the officer left, Williams suggested to Macomb that a letter from Fassett, declaring that a heavy body of militia were abos to fall into the hands of the British general, would have a salutary effect. Macomb directed Williams to carry out the plan. He went over to Burlington, and received from Fassett a letter to Macomng from St. Lawrence county, and that 4,000 from Washington county were in motion. This letter Williams placed in the hands of a shrewd Irishwoman at Cumberland Head, who took it to Prevost just afte
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Williams, Eleazar -1795 (search)
Williams, Eleazar -1795 The lost prince. A dark mystery shrouds the fate of the eldest son of Louis XVI. of France and Marie Antoinette, who was eight years of age at the time his father was murdered by the Jacobins. After the downfall of Robespierre and his fellows, it was declared that the prince died in prison in EleazEleazar Williams. 1795, while the royalists believed he had been secretly hidden away in the United States. Curious facts and circumstances pointed to Rev. Eleazar Williams, a reputed half-breed Indian, of the Caughnawaga tribe, near Montreal, as the surviving prince, who, for almost sixty years, had been hidden from the world in thatRev. Eleazar Williams, a reputed half-breed Indian, of the Caughnawaga tribe, near Montreal, as the surviving prince, who, for almost sixty years, had been hidden from the world in that disguise. He was a reputed son of Thomas Williams, son of Eunice, the captive daughter of Rev. John Williams, of Deerfield, Mass. He was educated at Long Meadow, Mass., and when the war with England broke out, in 1812, he became confidential agent of the government among the Indians in northern New York. He served in several eng