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James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 10 0 Browse Search
Charles A. Nelson , A. M., Waltham, past, present and its industries, with an historical sketch of Watertown from its settlement in 1630 to the incorporation of Waltham, January 15, 1739. 2 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 22, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 31, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen, Mrs. Elizabeth Cady Stanton. (search)
with the Indians. During her girlhood, it was an arena for the intellectual wrestlings of Kent, Tompkins, Spencer, Elisha Williams, and Abraham Van Vechten, who, as lawyers, were among the chiefest of their time. It is now devoted mainly to the fand say, My daughter, here is a book which, if you read it, will give you something sensible to say to Mr. Spencer and Mr. Williams when they next make us a visit. Mr. Spencer and Mr. Williams were legal magnates, who made Judge Cady's dinner-table Mr. Williams were legal magnates, who made Judge Cady's dinner-table a frequent arena for the discussion of nice points of law. So Elizabeth, with a fine determination to make herself the peer of the whole table, diligently began and pursued that study of the laws of her country, which has since armed and equipped hersed to give me law-books to read in order that I might have something sensible to say to your friends, Mr. Spencer and Mr. Williams, when they came to dine with us? It was by reading those law-books that I found out the injustice of our American law
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen, Victoria, Queen of England. (search)
esent royal house of England descended. Gibbon, indeed, traces the family of Guelph up to Charlemagne; but we need not follow him so far in the labyrinth of heraldry. Let it suffice us to know that a powerful prince of the Guelphian race, six hundred years ago or more, acquired by marriage extensive possessions in the north of Germany. This prince is known in the history of Germany as Henry the Black. Other Henries succeeded,--Henry the Proud, Henry the Lion, and a long line of Henries, Williams, Othos, Georges, and Ernests, until at length we find a branch of the family established in Hanover, and ruling that province with the title of elector. Not much can be said in commendation of the more recent ancestors of Queen Victoria. George the First was fiftyfour years of age when he stepped ashore at Greenwich, and walked to the royal palace in its park, hailed and saluted as King of England. He was an honest, hearty man, brave and resolute; but he had an incurable narrowness of
the Federal school and did not hesitate to freely express his sentiments, not perceiving that hostility to the government was encouragement to the enemy. Among the loyal men to whom his discourse was offensive were many of his best and firmest friends. Two Deacon Isaac Peirce and Mr. John Bright. of them left the church before the sermon was finished, and this gave rise to the story that the minister in Waltham had performed a miracle—casting out two devils. The seceders engaged Rev. Elisha Williams to preach for them, first in the district schoolhouse below the old grave-yard, and afterwards in the hall of the Kimball Tavern. They were arranging to build a church, when, in the following year through the efforts of some members of both churches, with the assistance of the Rev. Ezra Ripley, father of the pastor, a meeting of all parties was brought about, suitable apologies or explanations were made, the differences were healed, and the seceders returned to the First Church.
ns, 141 n. 1, 142. Whitman, Rev. Bernard (Unitarian), pastor of Second Cong. Ch. (1826), 114; death of, 115. Whitney: Joseph, 56; Nathaniel, 78; Sarah, 56. Whitney's Hill, 53. Whittemore, Rev., Thomas, 121. Widow (the) Brick, 69. Widow Coolidge's Tavern, 107. Wigwams: turned into well-built houses, 57; dwellings in place of huts and, 57. Wilderness, this, goes beyond England in food, 57. Willard, Maj., goes to relieve Groton, 61. William the Conqueror, 67. Williams, Rev., Elisha, preaches for Second Religious Society (1812), 109. Williams, Rev., John, of Deerfield, 56 n. 3. Williams, Dr., Leonard, 91, 96, 100. Williams, Roger, prevents an alliance between the Pequots and Narragansetts, 42. Williams, Rev. Warham ordained, 56; salary, 73; wants town to buy him a negro boy, 98; death of, 74. Willow near cotton factory, 130 n. 1. Willows in front of Fiske house, 139. Wilson, Mr., pastor at Boston, 23, 32. Windsor, 22; Plymouth people build
iliate the disaffected in the Eastern part of the State, believing that the Southern men had exercised too little clemency towards their neighbors of opposite views, but this favor gave too mach countenance to treason, added fuel to the flame, until Unionism has culminated in open rebellion. East Tennessee is threatened with immediate invasion from three different points. In the neighborhood of Pound Gap it is reported that there are from four to five thousand Federal troops, while Col. Williams, who is there to oppose them has comparatively a small force. Gen Zollicoffer is at Cumberland Gap to meet the invader there, but his force is greatly less than that of the enemy. We have a small force at James own, on the Cumberland mountain, but considerable fear is expressed that it is unable to prevent invasion from that direction. It is not well to think of security under such circumstances, when by a single defeat of our troops at either one of those points. the enemy would be
she shall make reasonable reparation, if not the alternative will not come in the desired form of protracted negotiation. No cavalry or horse artillery for Canada will be sent till spring. The London Herald takes strong ground against the News' argument in favor of arbitration and says that negotiations cannot be listened to while Messrs. Mason and Slidell are detained as prisoners. The Sheflield "Foreign Affairs Committee" had petitioned Government to visit its high displeasure on Captain Moir and Commander Williams for having, in the Trent affair, violated the Queen's proclamation, and thereby show to America that England's neutrality is strict and impartial. Prussia has rejected Deamark's proposition for a settlement of the Holstein question. Commercial Intelligence. Liverpool, Dec. 14. --Cotton closed flat, but prices unchanged. Sales 4,000 bales. Breadstuffs closed quiet but steady. Provisions closed firm. Consols closed at 90¼ a 90⅜.