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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 0 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.29 (search)
French recognition and alliance, which proved so opportune at Yorktown. Southern historians, with pardonable native pride, advance the claim of King's Mountains to the distinction Creasy accords to Saratoga; and with much show of reason, because at King's Mountain, the militia of the backwoods frontier of Southwest Virginia and the adjacent country of Tennessee, North Carolina and Kentucky, to the number of 910, under such master spirits as Campbell, Shelby, Levier, Cleveland, McDowell and Williams, with their hunting rifles met and destroyed Cornwallis' advance guard under Colonel Ferguson, composed of 1,016 of the flower of the British army, equipped with muskets and bayonets. Less than two thousand were here engaged and the battle lasted only an hour, but that hour was largely fraught with the nation's fate, in that it dispelled at once and forever, the fatal illusion that our colonial militia could not successfully contend with British regulars, and taught lessons infinite in val
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.37 (search)
Advance from Appomattox. From the Richmond News-leader, January 21, 1907. John Skelton Williams tells of the South's great forward March—Talks to Virginians living in Atlanta. Startling figures of Development and how the cotton Growers could Tie up the Commerce of the world. On Saturday the Virginia Society of Atlanta, Ga., gave a banquet in honor of General Lee's birthday. John Skelton Williams was the orator of the occasion. While his address in a great measure was statistiJohn Skelton Williams was the orator of the occasion. While his address in a great measure was statistical, many of his facts and figures are new and some of them are startling, and they will be found of intense interest by thinking people of the South and North. The address follows: Our advance from Appomattox. General Lee was one of the few men who have lived whose greatness and glory culminated with defeat and who won from disaster the ever-deepening love, the ever-rising reverence of mankind. I say he was. He is. His character and his qualities, which are the essentials and the reali
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
Eugene, 241. Wellford, Colonel. 4. West Virginia, Cattle captured in, 355. White, Colonel E. V., General, 255. White, Colonel, Norborne Berkeley, 261. Wilkinson, Lieut., Henry, Death of, 47. Williams, John Jefferson, 221. Williams, John Skelton, :36. Williams, Colonel Lewis B, 329. Willis, Chaplain E. J ,253. Wilson, Captain J. A., 76. Winder, General John H., 85. Wirz, Captain, Henry, Stigma, removed from, memory of, 69. Wise, Captain, O. Jennings, 355; General He Williams, John Jefferson, 221. Williams, John Skelton, :36. Williams, Colonel Lewis B, 329. Willis, Chaplain E. J ,253. Wilson, Captain J. A., 76. Winder, General John H., 85. Wirz, Captain, Henry, Stigma, removed from, memory of, 69. Wise, Captain, O. Jennings, 355; General Henry A, 354 Women of the Confederacy, what they saw and suffered, 191. Wooldridge, Colonel W. B., 259. Worsley, Philip Stanhope, his lines on General R. E Lee, 63 Wright, General Marcus J., 128.