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Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 21 7 Browse Search
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Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 3: (search)
Confederate Congress passed resolutions of thanks to Generals Polk, Pillow and Cheatham. In eastern Kentucky, Col. John S. Williams, with a Confederate force consisting of his regiment, the Fifth Kentucky infantry, Shawhan's battalion and other comn unorganized and half armed, barefooted squad. The Fifth Kentucky infantry was recruited by Colonel afterward Gen. John S. Williams, of Clark county, and organized in October, 1861, with the following officers: John S. Williams, colonel; A. J. MJohn S. Williams, colonel; A. J. May, of Morgan county, lieutenant-colonel; Hiram Hawkins, of Bath, major; William S. Rogers, A. Q. M.; J. H. Bums, A. C. S.; H. Rutherford, surgeon; Basil Duke, assistant surgeon. Its company organization for the first year was very incomplete until Bramlette, Thomas W. Thompson. Hunt's regiment was at first known as the Fifth, but it having been found that Col. John S. Williams had first appropriated that number, it was changed to the Ninth. It was recruited by Col. Thomas H. Hunt, of Lou
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 15: (search)
er, would have all been filled; but as it was, those under Col. D. Howard Smith, the Fifth; Col. J. Warren Grigsby, Sixth, and Col. Adam R. Johnson, Tenth, were soon available and made valuable accessions to the command a little later in middle Tennessee. With General Marshall also went out of Kentucky into Virginia a number of organizations, some of them regiments and others battalions, which did valuable service during the remainder of the war. Among these were the Fifth infantry, Gen. John S. Williams' original regiment, whose time had expired, but which was recruited and reorganized by Col. Hiram Hawkins; the Fourth Kentucky cavalry, Col. Henry L. Giltner; Eleventh Kentucky mounted infantry, known also as the Thirteenth regiment Kentucky cavalry, Col. Benjamin E. Caudill; Second battalion Kentucky cavalry, Maj. Clarence J. Prentice; Second Kentucky mounted rifles, Lieut.-Col. Thomas Johnson; and the Third battalion Kentucky mounted rifles, Lieut.-Col. Ezekiel F. Clay; together wi
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 18: (search)
e for military success, he was undoubtedly the ablest general from the volunteer service, excelled by few who had the trademark of the profession, and superior to scores who claimed distinction by virtue of their diplomas rather than their merit or success in the field. After the battle of Winchester, Va., September, 1864, in which he rendered his usual service, he was ordered back to the command of his department, reaching there just in time to repel an attack upon the salt works, Gen. John S. Williams having opportunely arrived with a body of cavalry from Gen. J. E. Johnston's army and defeated Burbridge, who commanded the Federal force. During the absence of General Breckinridge in the Shenandoah valley, General Morgan had made an extensive raid in Kentucky in June, doing much damage, but suffering severely at Mt. Sterling and Cynthiana. His command was much demoralized as the result of this expedition, and by the subsequent death of its distinguished chief. In December, G
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 20: (search)
oe, Major, September 23, 1861—Joseph P. Nuckols, Major, Lieutenant-Colonel, Colonel—Thomas W. Thompson, Major, Lieutenant-Colonel—John A. Adair, Lieutenant-Colonel—John B. Rogers, Major— Joseph H. Millett, Major. Fifth Kentucky infantry: John S. Williams, Colonel, November 16, 1861—Andrew J. May, Colonel, May 21, 1861—Hiram Hawkins, Colonel, November 14, 1862— William Mynhier, Major, Lieutenant-Colonel—George W. Connor, Major, Lieutenant-Colonel—Richard Hawes, Major. Sixth Regiment Kentuclor (Louisiana). Major-Generals John C. Breckinridge, George B. Crittenden, William Preston, Gustavus W. Smith. Brigadier-Generals John. H. Morgan, Daniel W. Adams (Louisiana), Roger W. Hanson, Basil W. Duke, Abram Buford, Geo. B. Cosby, John S. Williams, James M. Hawes, Ben Hardin Helm, George B. Hodge, Claiborne F. Jackson (Missouri), Joseph H. Lewis, Samuel B. Maxey (Texas), H. B. Lyon, Randall L. Gibson (Louisiana), Thomas H. Taylor. The number of the rank and file in the
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
patriotic devotion to the South by serving without rank on the staff of Gen. J. S. Williams. Gen. Basil Duke, in an article on John Morgan in 1864, makes mention ofshed Notes on Life Insurance, and Confederate War Papers. Brigadier-General John Stuart Williams Brigadier-General John Stuart Williams was born in Montgomery Brigadier-General John Stuart Williams was born in Montgomery county, Ky., in 1820. Getting his preparatory education in the schools of his native county he entered the Miami university at Oxford, Ohio, where he was graduated inia. After the removal of General Marshall to another field of operations General Williams remained in east Tennessee, and in September, 1863, took command of the de of Burnside to the best of his ability. In November, at his own request, General Williams was relieved of his command and Col. Henry L. Giltner took charge of the brigade. General Williams continued, however, to operate in this region, and in September of 1864 helped to defeat the attack of General Burbridge upon the salt works