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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 28 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 18: Stratford-on-avon.—Warwick.—London.—Characters of judges and lawyers.—authors.—society.—January, 1839, to March, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
lating in English society, written by Alderson and Williams; and when I quoted an out-of-the-way line from Juvmade public. Admire, I pray you, the epigram by Johnny Williams on Napoleon. After reading it, I took down thed with several others, and I must say that I think Williams's the best; it is a wonderful feat in the Greek lan print. I have also heard Baron Parke repeat it. Williams is said to know Virgil and several other classics Hall. Abinger, Parke, Alderson, Tindal, Coltman, Williams, and one other,—I forget which,—were all of this csification. I expressed to him my admiration of Johnny Williams's Epigram on Napoleon, and told him that I thou himself on these matters. He then repeated to me Williams's lines on the Apollo, and took up his pen and wroo sent them to Lord Leicester at Holkham; to Mr. Justice Williams, now on his circuit; and to the Bishop of Dutorney-General, Talfourd, Follett, Wilde, Vaughan, Williams, &c. were counsel, went away saying that there are
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Jan. 16, 1839. (search)
dary, being too long. Brougham told me that his own Greek epigram was the worst of all. You will see an allusion to this story in a note in the last Quarterly Review, to which I first called Chantrey's attention. I have spoken of Courtenay as the great gastronomer; I shall not neglect to add that he is as good a scholar as epicure. When we were speaking of Greek epigrams, he and Brougham alternately quoted to me several, which were circulating in English society, written by Alderson and Williams; and when I quoted an out-of-the-way line from Juvenal, Courtenay at once gave the next one. Indeed, in the fine English society you will be struck by this thorough. ness of classical education, which makes a Latin or Greek epigram a choice morsel even for a dainty epicure. Strange union that in Brougham! I have met few men who seemed such critics of food. Courtenay had been in Germany; and Brougham said to Miss C., I understand you have been flirting with the King of Bavaria, and that
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Jan. 27, 1839. (search)
. 495-537,—Foreign Relations of Great Britain. The epigram is given in a note to page 508, where it was first made public. Admire, I pray you, the epigram by Johnny Williams on Napoleon. After reading it, I took down the Greek Anthology, and compared it with the famous one on Themistocles and with several others, and I must say that I think Williams's the best; it is a wonderful feat in the Greek language. Lord B. repeated it to me at table, before it appeared in print. I have also heard Baron Parke repeat it. Williams is said to know Virgil and several other classics by heart. In society he is very dull; but he does write beautiful Greek. Lord BroughWilliams is said to know Virgil and several other classics by heart. In society he is very dull; but he does write beautiful Greek. Lord Brougham's work will not be published till next week. It is on Natural Theology, in two volumes, and embraces an analysis of Cuvier, Newton's Principia, and Laplace's Mecanique Celeste. I saw him in his study yesterday; he had a printer's devil on one side and his private secretary on the other. Mirabile dictu, he did not use an oath
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, March 1, 1839. (search)
e next morning, while at breakfast with Lord Morpeth, encountering Lord Ebrington (now Lord Fortescue), who has just been sent to Ireland by the present ministry. Two days before, I had met the last Whig Viceroy, the Marquis of Normanby, at Lord Durham's. Let me acknowledge, in this already overgrown letter, the receipt of Felton's verses. On Chantrey's Woodcocks, ante, Vol. I. p. 378. I first gave them to Lord Brougham, and have also sent them to Lord Leicester at Holkham; to Mr. Justice Williams, now on his circuit; and to the Bishop of Durham: so that they are in the hands of the best anthologists in the kingdom. I mentioned them one day at dinner to Sir Francis Chantrey; Sir Francis Chantrey, 1781-1841. Among his works are The Sleeping Children, in Lichfield Cathedral, and statues of William Pitt, Canning, and Washington. and he prayed oyer, though he does not know a word of Greek. I have, accordingly, given him a copy. I do not know if I have ever spoken of Chantrey
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, chapter 30 (search)
as illustrated by his genius and learning, is affectionately inscribed by Charles Sumner. The Judge wrote to him, May 28: I am rejoiced to have my name united with yours in this manner, so that the public may know how long and intimate our friendship has been, and that we may swim down the stream of time together. . And, in reference to a remark of Sumner which disparaged an editor's labors, lie added: Next to a good reporter I hold a good annotator. What were Saunders now worth but for Williams's notes? What were Coke on Littleton but for Hargrave and Butler? The Law Reporter, in announcing the edition, said: May, 1844, Vol. VII. pp. 57, 58. The publishers have secured the valuable editorial services of Charles Sumner, Esq., whose distinguished professional reputation is a sufficient assurance that the department of the work intrusted to his hands — the addition of the American cases and the recent English decisions–will be performed in a manner worthy of the high charact
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Harper's Ferry and first Manassas. (search)
900) Professor in the Virginia Female Institute at Staunton, Va. Our mess at that time consisted of about twenty-five or thirty, nearly all of the best fellows in the company, and we employed two Irishmen to cook for us, but the number being entirely too large, some of us employed a servant and organized another mess, consisting of ten of us, and ever afterwards knowne as Mess No. 10; it consisted of David Barton, See notes 2, 3, 13 and 16. Holmes Boyd, See notes 2, 3, 13 and 16. Johnny Williams, John J. Williams, of Winchester, Va., later Sergeant in Chew's Battery of horse artillery; attorney-at-law and Mayor of Winchester, Va.; Commander of the Grand Camp, C. V., of Virginia; died in Baltimore, Md., October, 1899. Lyt. Macon, See notes 2, 3, 13 and 16. Lanty Blackford, Launcelot M. Blackford, of Lynchburg, Va., later Lieutenant and Adjutant of the 24th Virginia Regiment; now (1900),and for thirty years past, Principal of the Episcopal High School of Virginia. Randol