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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Williams, Jonathan 1750-1815 (search)
Williams, Jonathan 1750-1815 Military officer; born in Boston, Mass., May 26, 1750; was engaged in mercantile and shipping business in early life. Dr. Franklin was his great-uncle, and kindly received his nephew when in England (1770-73), and intrusted him with the bearing of important letters and documents to Massachusetts. Visiting France in 1777, he was appointed commercial agent of Congress, and in 1785 returned to the United States and settled with Franklin in Philadelphia. For several years he was judge of the court of common pleas in Philadelphia. In 1801 he was made a major of artillery and inspector of fortifications, and was appointed the first superintendent of the Military Academy at West Point. He was colonel of engineers from 1808 to 1812, and general of New York militia from 1812 to 1815. He was a delegate in Congress from Philadelphia in 1814, and was made vice-president of the American Philological Society. He died in Philadelphia, May 16, 1815.
Hill, when he removed to Lex. leaving his mansion to the flames which consumed the village. After a temporary residence in Lex., Stoneham, and Medf., he rem. here and purchased the Monis estate 11 Feb. 1786, at the S. E. corner of Brighton and Winthrop streets, where he closed his long life. He had previously, from 18 Sept. 1738 to 7 Jan. 1749, owned the estate at the N. E. corner of Holmes Place; but whether he resided there is not ascertained. Mr. Mason m. Rebecca, dau. of Deac. Jonathan Williams of Boston, 17 Feb. 1736-7; she d. in childbed 2 Ap. 1748, and he m. Elizabeth, dau. of Jonathan Sewall, Esq., of Boston, 7 Nov. 1748; she d. 12 Feb. 1755, and he m. Ann, dau. of Thomas Fayerweather, Esq., 18 Oct. 1759. His children were Jonathan, b. 15 Dec. 1737, d. unm. 18 Nov. 1760 (he was drowned on a voyage to the West Indies); Rebecca, b. 17 Dec. 1738, m. William Harris 20 Aug. 1767, and d. 2 Feb. 1801 (she was mother of the late Thaddeus Mason Harris, D. D., of Dorchester); Tha
Hill, when he removed to Lex. leaving his mansion to the flames which consumed the village. After a temporary residence in Lex., Stoneham, and Medf., he rem. here and purchased the Monis estate 11 Feb. 1786, at the S. E. corner of Brighton and Winthrop streets, where he closed his long life. He had previously, from 18 Sept. 1738 to 7 Jan. 1749, owned the estate at the N. E. corner of Holmes Place; but whether he resided there is not ascertained. Mr. Mason m. Rebecca, dau. of Deac. Jonathan Williams of Boston, 17 Feb. 1736-7; she d. in childbed 2 Ap. 1748, and he m. Elizabeth, dau. of Jonathan Sewall, Esq., of Boston, 7 Nov. 1748; she d. 12 Feb. 1755, and he m. Ann, dau. of Thomas Fayerweather, Esq., 18 Oct. 1759. His children were Jonathan, b. 15 Dec. 1737, d. unm. 18 Nov. 1760 (he was drowned on a voyage to the West Indies); Rebecca, b. 17 Dec. 1738, m. William Harris 20 Aug. 1767, and d. 2 Feb. 1801 (she was mother of the late Thaddeus Mason Harris, D. D., of Dorchester); Tha
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Terry's Brigade, formerly John M. Jones's. (search)
W. Dawson, Zzz=Co. H. W. C. Hightower, Zzz=Co. H. Private J. C. Meadors, Zzz=Co. H. T. J. Monk, Zzz=Co. H. C. H. Thompson, Zzz=Co. H. J. A. Reid, Zzz=Co. H. S. W. May,Co. K. Chief Mus'n C. L. Doll, Co. B. Mus'n P. A. Williams, Co. I. Jno. Williams, Co. C. C. B. Harrison, Co. I. Simeon Palvido, Co. B. A. Burnstein, Co. A. P. H. Allen, Co. H. P. T. Duke. Co. D. [41] Fourteenth Louisiana Regiment. Sergeant-Maj. Z. Imbeau,Co. B. Sergeant Jacob Bouton,Co. C. W. H. Clay,C Co. G. Sergeant F. C. Sims, M. P. H. Peoples, Corporal J. J, Cumpston, Private B. Flynn, S. Joyce, Private H. Shields, H. Smith, J. Weathers, E. Sweeney. Co. H .—Private A. R. Valls. Co. I. Sergeant J. W. Walker, Private Jno. Williams. Co. K. Sergeant J. C. Robertson. Private Jno. Sprowles, Corporal J. Littinger, Jno. White. Private F. Haden, I certify, on honor, that of the above number of men there were present, actually armed and in line of battle, one hundr
d Bernard to Shelburne, 14 Nov. 1766. relief, except on condition of a general amnesty. Of those seeking compensation, said he, the chief is a person of unconstitutional principles, as one day or other he will make appear. Hutchinson to J. Williams, of Hatfield, 7 Dec. 1766; and J. Williams in reply, 5 Jan. 1767. Hutchinson to Charles Paxton, then in London, Dec. 1766. The Resolves of Parliament were cited in reply. The Parliament of Great Britain, retorted Hawley, has no right to legiJ. Williams in reply, 5 Jan. 1767. Hutchinson to Charles Paxton, then in London, Dec. 1766. The Resolves of Parliament were cited in reply. The Parliament of Great Britain, retorted Hawley, has no right to legislate for us. At these words Otis, rising in his place, bowed and thanked him, saying, He has gone further than I myself have as yet done in this House. Bernard's very long letter to Shelburne, of 24 Dec. 1766. It was the first time that the power of Parliament had been totally denied in a Chap. XXVII.} 1766. Nov. colonial Legislature. No Representation, no Taxation, had become a very common expression; the Colonies were beginning to cry, No Representation, no Legislation. Hutchinson'
ent to tax America. But this sovereignty being asserted, the Ministry, terrified by the recovery of Chatham which alarmed Camden and Grafton, and by the complaints of the merchants at the diminution of exports, were content with the Parliamentary sanction of their measures, wished the controversy with the Colonies well over, and sought to lull them into acquiescence. The plan for altering the Charter of Massachusetts on which Hillsborough had been definitively resolved, Hutchinson to J. Williams of Hatfield, 29 January, 1769. was for the present, laid aside; discretionary orders were transmitted to Gage to send back to Halifax the two regiments, which were brought from that station, and to restore the regular rotation by sending two other regiments to Ireland. Hillsborough to Gage, 24 March; 1769. Bernard was given up and recalled with a promise to the London merchants that he should not be employed in the Colonies again; and the government of Massachusetts was to be confided
ill Tuesday; Journals of the Committee, VI. 458; Information of Francis Rotch. and authorized Samuel Adams to invite the Committees of the five surrounding towns, Dorchester, Roxbury, Brookline, Cambridge, and Charlestown, with their Chap. L.} 1773. Nov. own townsmen and those of Boston to hold a Mass Meeting the next morning. Faneuil Hall could not contain the people, that poured in on Monday. The concourse was the largest ever known. Adjourning to the Old South Meeting-house, Jonathan Williams did not fear to act as Moderator, nor Samuel Adams, Hancock, Young, Molineux, and Warren Francis Rotch's. Information. to conduct the business of the meeting. On the motion of Samuel Adams, who entered fully into the question, the Assembly, composed of upwards of five thousand persons, resolved unanimously, that the tea should be sent back to the place from whence it came at all events, and that no duty should be paid on it. The only way to get rid of it said Young, is to throw it
ce are also as highly appreciated in monarchies as in Republics; perhaps, even more so. Shakespeare, Burns and Bunyan were all men of low degree; but kings and nobles are proud to do them reverence. Some of the brightest lights of the English bar and Parliament were men of humble extraction. Lord Eldon was the son of a barge maker; Lord Stovell, of a small coal dealer; Lord Tenteeden, of a barber; Lord Gifford, prior to his being called to the bar, was the poor clerk of a solicitor; Sir Jno. Williams, one of the Judges of the Queen's Bench, was the son of a very poor horse dealer in Yorkshire; Lord Truro (who married a first cousin of Queen Victoria,) was son of a very poor man in Cornwall; Mr. Baron Gurney, son of a poor lady in London; Lord Campbell, the present Lord Chancellor, was for many years reporter to the Morning Chronicle; Lord St. Leonards was son of a barber; Chief Justice Saunders was a beggar boy; Lord Kenyon, boot-black and errand boy; Lord Hardwick, an errand boy;