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lleryCol. J. A. J. BradfordAug. 20, 1861.  Col. Stephen D. PoolSept. 7, 1863.  11thNorth CarolinaRegimentInfantryCol. Collett LeventhorpeOct. 26, 1861.Promoted Brigadier-General. 12thNorth CarolinaRegimentInfantryCol. Henry E. Coleman   Col. Sol. Williams   13thNorth CarolinaRegimentInfantryCol. Joseph H. HymanJune 13, 1863.  Col. A. M. Scales Promoted Brigadier-General. 14thNorth CarolinaRegimentInfantryCol. R. T. Bennett   Col. W. P. Roberts Promoted Brigadier-General. 15thNorth Carol CarolinaRegimentPartisan RangersCol. A. D. MooreAug. 3, 1863.  67thNorth CarolinaRegimentInfantryCol. John N. WhitfordJan. 18, 1864.  68thNorth CarolinaRegimentInfantryCol. James W. HintonJuly 8, 1863.  1stNorth CarolinaBattalionInfantryLt. Col. Williams   1stNorth CarolinaBattalionHeavy ArtilleryMaj. Alexander MacRaeMarch 25, 1863.  1stNorth CarolinaBattalionSharpshooters    2dNorth CarolinaBattalionInfantryLt. Col. W. J. Green   Maj. Jno. M. HancockJune 22, 1863.  3dN
say hundreds, of officers into other commands. From the material assembled at Raleigh, the First regiment was soon formed and hurried away to Virginia under Major Hill, whom it elected colonel. Then, says Major Gordon, whose excellent article on the Organization of the Troops furnishes many of these facts, the Second, Third, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth and Seventh soon followed. The first six were sent to Virginia, the Seventh to Hatteras. These regiments were under the following colonels: Solomon Williams, W. D. Pender, Junius Daniel, R. M. McKinney, Stephen Lee and W. F. Martin. However, many of them were soon reorganized. Between the 15th of June and the 18th of July, the Eighth, Colonel Radcliffe; the Tenth, Colonel Iverson; the Eleventh, Colonel Kirkland; the Twelfth, Colonel Pettigrew; the Thirteenth, Colonel Hoke; the Fourteenth, Colonel Clarke, were organized. It will be noticed that no Ninth regiment is included in these fourteen. There was some controversy about the officer
d the colors of the Tenth New York regiment. General Hampton commends a dashing feat performed by a squadron under command of Capt. W. H. H. Cowles, who, with Capt. W. R. Wood, charged through the ranks of the enemy, following him for some miles and returning around his columns in safety, with sixty prisoners. Captain Wood charged successfully an infantry force. The Fifth, Fourth and Second cavalry were also engaged. The Second regiment was severely engaged and lost its brave colonel, Sol. Williams, of whom General Stuart said: He was as fearless as he was efficient. Maj. Rufus Barringer, whose conduct is praised by General Hampton, was severely wounded. The Union loss was 837; Confederate, 575. The day after this battle, General Ewell started on his campaign against General Milroy in the Shenandoah valley. General Ewell's corps embraced the divisions of Rodes, Early and Johnson. In Rodes' division were three North Carolina brigades, Iverson's, Daniel's and Ramseur's; in Ear
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Junius Daniel. an Address delivered before the Ladies' Memorial Association, in Raleigh, N. C, May 10th, 1888. (search)
was elected colonel of the Forty-third regiment at its organization, but declined the office in favor of a promising young officer, who had given decided evidence of ability. He also declined the command of the Second cavalry in favor of Colonel Sol. Williams, saying, with the frankness of the true soldier, Williams is a better man, for he is par excellence a cavalryman, so put him there. He first served as colonel of the Forty-fifth under General Holmes, who discovered his fine qualificationWilliams is a better man, for he is par excellence a cavalryman, so put him there. He first served as colonel of the Forty-fifth under General Holmes, who discovered his fine qualification as a soldier, and recommended him for promotion, asking that he might be assigned to duty under him. The Government found itself embarrassed with brigadier-generals, while suffering from poverty of brigades. This application was denied, but an officer of that grade was tendered to General Holmes, who declined, saying you can keep your generals; I can get along with my colonels. From this time until he received his commission as brigadier-general he served under three department commanders,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Graduates of the United States Military Academy at West Point, N. Y., [from the Richmond, Va., Dispatch, March 30, April 6, 27, and May 12, 1902.] (search)
e, December 5, 1862. Ordnance Bureau, Richmond, Va. James H. Hallonquist. 1803. Born South Carolina. Appointed South Carolina. 6. Lieutenant-Colonel Artillery, July 17, 1862. Staff of General Braxton Bragg, commanding Army of Tennessee; then commanding Reserve Artillery, Army of Tennessee, June 1o, 1864. Leroy Napier. 1807. Born Georgia. Appointed Georgia. 1o. Lieutenant-Colonel, Eighth Georgia Battalion, Gist's Brigade, Walker's Division, Army of Tennessee. Solomon Williams. 1808. Born North Carolina. Appointed North Carolina. 11. Colonel, commanding Twelfth North Carolina Infantry. Killed June 9, 1863, at Culpeper Courthouse, Virginia. Richard H. Brewer. 1809. Born Maryland. Appointed Maryland. 12. Major, Assistant Adjutant-General, staff of Lieutenant-General Polk (Army of Mississippi), Army of Tennessee. Died June 25, 1864, of wounds received June 5, at Piedmont, Va. Andrew Jackson.* 1812. Born Tennessee. Appointed at Larg
The County Court of Ohio county, Va., has ordered a port to be opened for Congress, in face of the Ordinance of the Convention.--One of the magistrates, A. M. Jacob, entered his protest against the proceeding. Capt. Solomon Williams, a native of Nash county, N. C., has resigned his commission in the United States Army, and returned to North Carolina, to place himself at the service of his native State. The name of Thomas Francis Meagher has been unanimously stricken from the roll of honorary members of the Hibernian Society of Charleston. "Timber is very scarce" in New York, (says the Charleston Courier,) when it is attempted to make a Colonel or a gentleman out of Doubleday. "You were misinformed when told that I had joined the Secessionists. I am just where I was ten years ago, for the Union, and nothing but the Union." Col. J. A. Throckmorton, who lately resigned a Federal office, has been elected Orderly Sergeant of the Washington Home Guard, of Ale
The Regiment, all told, numbers about 1,300 men.--They are officered in a way to leave no room to doubt that they will not put in their best licks against the common enemy. We append a list of staff and company officers: Colonel, Solomon Williams, late of the U. S. Dragoons in New Mexico; Lieut. Colonel, Edward Cantwell, of Raleigh, served in Mexico; Major, Hon. Aug. W. Burton, Senator from Cleveland county; Adjutant, C. A. Durham, of the North Carolina Military Academy; Quartermaste, of Raleigh, served in Mexico; Major, Hon. Aug. W. Burton, Senator from Cleveland county; Adjutant, C. A. Durham, of the North Carolina Military Academy; Quartermaster, W. T. Alston; Commissary, W. T. Arrington; Surgeons, Drs. Johnston and Miller; A Company, Capt. Wade; B Company, Capt. Wortham; C Company, Capt. Ray; D Company, Capt. Norment; E Company, Capt. Jones; F Company, Capt. Williams; G Company, Capt. Kenan; H Company, Capt. Fulton; I Company, Capt. Whitaker; K Company, Capt. Coleman.
Recovered. --Constable George W. Thomas, of Henrico, succeeded yesterday in recovering one of a splendid pair of Navy Colt's Pistols, stolen from Col. Solomon Williams, of the Second North Carolina Regiment of volunteers during their encampment near this city. The recovered article will be sent to Col. Williams, while Constable Thomas will endeavor to ascertain the whereabouts of the other pistol. Recovered. --Constable George W. Thomas, of Henrico, succeeded yesterday in recovering one of a splendid pair of Navy Colt's Pistols, stolen from Col. Solomon Williams, of the Second North Carolina Regiment of volunteers during their encampment near this city. The recovered article will be sent to Col. Williams, while Constable Thomas will endeavor to ascertain the whereabouts of the other pistol.
The Daily Dispatch: July 24, 1862., [Electronic resource], Partisan Rangers and private citizens captured by the enemy. (search)
Execution of negroes. --At Kinston, N. C., on Friday last, two slaves, owned by Rev. W. P. Middle and Ellaba Coward, were executed by the order of Col. Sol. Williams, Military Commandant, for communicating with the Federal at Newborn and enticing slaves from their masters. Jack, one of them, said he was recruiting for Burnside, with the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel. He plead the old John Brown excuse.
The Daily Dispatch: June 11, 1863., [Electronic resource], The cavalry fight in Culpeper — further particulars. (search)
on both sides heavy. Our loss in officers was, as usual, very considerable. Among those killed we have heard the names of Col. Hampton, brother of Gen. Wade Hampton, of Hampton's Legion; Col. John S. Green, of Rappahannock county, and Col. Solomon Williams, of the 18th North Carolina regiment. The latter was married only one week ago. Among the wounded, we have heard of Col. Lee, son of Gen. R. E. Lee, who was shot through the thigh, and Col. Butler, of South Carolina, who is reported to haverepresented to have been pretty severe. We were unable to learn what particular forces we had in the fight. One gentleman reported that the active fighting was done by Hampton's Legion, a North Carolina regiment of cavalry, commanded by Col. Williams, and the 4th and 5th Virginia cavalry, but that the brigade of Gen. Jones, lately from the Valley, was also engaged. After our men recovered from their surprise, we gained a favorable position, which was held throughout the day, although
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