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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 12 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 18, 1861., [Electronic resource] 7 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Charles J. Williams or search for Charles J. Williams in all documents.

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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 1: (search)
of infantry from Edgefield district, South Carolina. Brigadier-General Harris was in chief command, aided by Brig.-Gen. Charles J. Williams, of Columbus; and Lieut.-Col. Alfred Cumming was in immediate command of the armed force, consisting of the Action of Captain Elzey. In the conference which fixed the terms of the withdrawal, the governor was accompanied by Generals Williams and Harris, Col. W. H. T. Walker, and his aides, Colonels Jackson and Phil. lips, all of whom joined the governor ver to the Confederate States government with the title of the First regiment Georgia regulars. Of this regiment, Charles J. Williams was commissioned colonel, March 5, 1861. The First regulars served for some time in Virginia in Toombs', then in gn of the Carolinas in 1865 in Harrison's brigade, in the division commanded, first by McLaws, and at the time of Johnston's surrender, by Maj.-Gen. E. S. Walthall. The first colonel of the regiment, C. J. Williams, died in the early part of 1862.
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: (search)
the State now in the Confederate service in Virginia, at Pensacola and on our own coast, in all, some twenty-three regiments. Georgia has now to look to the shotguns and rifles in the hands of her people for coast defense, and to guns which her gunsmiths are slowly manufacturing. The report of the comptroller-general, made at the close of the fiscal year, June, 1861, showed that Georgia had put into the field or camp the following troops, exclusive of artillery: First regulars Col. C. J. Williams; First of Georgia, Col. H. W. Mercer; First volunteers, Col. J. N. Ramsey; Second volunteers, Col. Paul J. Semmes; Third volunteers, Col. H. R. Wright; Fourth volunteers, Col. George Doles; Fifth volunteers, Col. John K. Jackson; Sixth volunteers, Col. A. H. Colquitt; Seventh volunteers, Col. L. J. Gartrell; Eighth volunteers, Col: Francis S. Bartow; Ninth volunteers, Col. E. R. Goulding; Tenth volunteers, Col. Lafayette McLaws: Eleventh volunteers, Col. George T. Anderson; Twelfth vo
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 16: (search)
stance. On the following day Wheeler was attacked in the absence of Martin's division by infantry and cavalry under General Steedman, and the enemy suffered considerable loss, including General Steedman slightly wounded and one colonel killed. Williams' brigade destroyed the road at various points between Tunnel Hill and Graysville, and the enemy were kept from making any repairs until August 20th, when Wheeler pushed on into Tennessee with his main force. But he left 200 picked men to raid twhole expedition to capture one of his men or take any property from him. High water compelled him to cross Holston and French Broad above Knoxville, fighting each time for the right of way and defeating a column of cavalry from Knoxville. General Williams was here detached for a side expedition, and Wheeler kept on with a depleted force. He went on nearly to Nashville and thence south to Alabama, repulsing the attacks of Major-Generals Rousseau, Steedman, and Brigadier-generals Croxton and G