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w-Orleans; fought the batteries of Vicksburgh twice; was in the memorable attack on Port Hudson on the fourteenth of March, 1863; was captain of a nine-inch gun in the naval nine-inch gun battery, commanded by Lieutenant Commander Edward Terry, placed in rear of Port Hudson during the siege of that place in 1863; he was also captain of a gun in the naval battery established at Baton Rouge, and commanded by Lieutenant Commander Edward Terry, after the repulse of the army and the death of General Williams at that place. 7. Walter E. Smith (ordinary seaman) is recommended for coolness and good conduct at the rifle one-hundred pounder on the top-gallant forecastle, and for musket-firing into the gun-ports of the rebel iron-clad Tennessee in the action in Mobile Bay on the morning and forenoon of August fifth, 1864. He was on board the United States steamer Hatteras when that vessel was sunk by the piratical vessel commanded by the notorious Semmes off Galveston; joined the Richmond, af
s in East-Tennessee: The affair at Rogersville, East-Tennessee, affords some mitigation of the general ignoring of the campaign there. A series of movements of the most unfortunate and disgraceful character, illustrated by the retreat of General Williams, glorious to him and his command, but wholly shameful to those responsible for his exposed position, the only other matter of commendation, justifies this sweeping phrase. A true relation of these will, doubtless, fill a dark page in histor-General Jones, accordingly, was directed to put his brigade in motion, so as to bring himself, on Thursday evening, within a night's march, by the south side of Holston River, down the valley of Buck Creek; while Colonel Giltner, commanding Brigadier-General Williams's brigade, was to move from Kingsport and its vicinity, on the north side of the river. During the afternoon of the fifth Colonel Giltner concentrated his command, and went into camp at Kingsport, and ordered his force to move at
two of the guards, wounded five, pillaged seven wagons and burned five, and captured two hundred horses. It was a bold, daring act; but the train was some two miles in length, and a guard of only seventy-five men to protect it. As soon as the General got the news, he sent the Third Virginia in pursuit, if possible to overtake them; but the rebels had six hours start, and with their knowledge of the country, but a slight prospect of overtaking them. This evening we camped on the farm of Mrs. Williams, who has a son with McNeil, and she, with her daughters, are bitter secesh. But we found corn and hay in abundance, and that was what our horses needed, so we used it. The morning of the seventeenth we started for New-Creek, where we arrived in the afternoon, and where our ears were gladdened by the music of the steam-whistles on the locomotives of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. It is refreshing to hear the sounds, to see sights, and witness the customs of civilization, in contr
. Rebel loss from fifteen to twenty killed and sixty prisoners; our loss, one severely and several slightly wounded. Again, on November fourth, that Major Fitzgibbon, Fourteenth Michigan infantry, came upon the combined forces of Cooper, Kirk, Williams, and Scott, (guerrillas,) at Lawrenceburgh, thirty-five miles from Columbia, and after a severe hand-to-hand fight, defeated them, killing eight, wounding seven, and capturing twenty-four prisoners; among the latter are one captain and two lieuter-General Stein-wehr, 25 killed, 176 wounded, 124 missing--aggregate, 325; Third division, Major-General Schurz, 1 killed, 14 wounded, 10 missing--aggregate, 25. Total, 350. Twelfth Army Corps--Major-General Slocum: First division, Brigadier-General Williams, not engaged; Second division, Brigadier-General George, 56 killed, 255 wounded, 4 missing--aggregate, 345. Total, 345. Grand Total, 529 killed, 3281 wounded, 141 missing--aggregate, 3955. The following is a copy of a telegram ju
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 102.-capture of rebel guerrillas. (search)
which fired into a Government boat below Tiptonville, about three months ago. Another one, Lewis Claims, belongs to Faulkner's command. Gregg says he was a private in Merriweather's gang, but deserted him when Merriweather went South. George Moore, also member of the same party, formerly of the army of Clayton, we have no particular information of, but he was found with the rest at Lewis's house. Lewis is a paroled prisoner, and was formerly a captain in the Fifteenth Tennessee volunteers, of the rebel army, and states that during the last six months the guerrillas have eaten over two hundred dollars' worth of provisions at his house. He has a pass from General Quimby, formerly commanding this district. Of the captured horses eight have been sent to Columbus. At nearly every house we visited, we found guns, which we destroyed. The prisoners will be examined and sent to Captain Williams. M. E. Rings, Captain Company C, Thirty-fourth New-Jersey Infantry, Commanding Post.