hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 73 7 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 70 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 67 1 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 56 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 26 4 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 25 3 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 23 1 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 20 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 4, 1862., [Electronic resource] 18 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 15 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Thomas Williams or search for Thomas Williams in all documents.

Your search returned 34 results in 6 document sections:

On the afternoon of the fourth inst., Brig.-Gen. Williams ordered me forward with my own regimenting the ground with his dead. The brave Gen. Williams fell in front of the Sixth Michigan, towarning of the fourth inst. I was informed by Gen. Williams that rebels, in considerable force, under rove in the left wing of our army, killing Gen. Williams. Our men retreating, I opened fire with s's forces under Gen. Breckinridge attacked Gen. Williams, drove in his pickets, etc. General Williahree miles, but unfortunately the gallant General Williams, while cheering on his men, received a Minie-ball through the heart. Gen. Williams had informed Lieut. Commanding Ransom the evening befgallant and successful fellow-soldier. General Williams graduated at West-Point in 1837; at once ike, skilfully-planned fights of this war. Gen. Williams, with his well-known abilities as a leaderits glow of triumph. I am convinced that had Williams not fallen, he would have destroyed the whole[16 more...]
day, another flag approached, with a document addressed To the commanding officer of the confederate forces outside of Baton Rouge. This was from Col. Cahill, and disclaimed the right of the officer sending the first. It appears that after Gen. Williams (who was chief in command) was killed, and Colonels Keith and McMillan had fallen, there was a controversy among the Federals as to the ranking officer, but the succession finally devolved on Cahill. One of the most hotly contested points is eyes not removed until he was taken into the arsenal building, the window-shutters of which were closed. He was not permitted to see General Clark, but learned that he was still living and well cared for. The enemy acknowledge the loss of Gen. Williams, Colonels Keith and McMillan, and about eight hundred killed and missing. The expedition has not proved a complete success, owing entirely to the Arkansas not having cooperated. Had not that vessel met with an unfortunate accident, the vi
y of Gen. Banks himself during the whole of the engagement. He was in the front, and exposed as much as any man in the command. His example was of the greatest benefit, and he merits and should receive the commendation of his government. Generals Williams, Augur, Gorman, Crawford, Prince, Green, and Geary, behaved with conspicuous gallantry. Augur and Geary were severely wounded, and Prince, by losing his way in the dark while passing from one flank to the other, fell into the hands of the he surrender of Vicksburgh and its defences to the lawful authority of the United States, under which private property and personal rights shall be respected. Respectfully yours, S. Phillips Lee, U. S.N., Commanding Advance Naval Division. T. Williams, Brigadier-General. Mayor's office, Vicksburgh, Miss., May 18, 1862. To S. Phillips Lee, Commanding Advance Naval Division: Your communication of this date, addressed To the authorities of Vicksburgh, has been delivered to me. In reply, I
e passed with his rear-guard by ten o'clock in the morning. The behavior of Gen. Banks's corps during the action was very fine. No greater gallantry and daring could be exhibited by any troops. I cannot speak too highly of the ceaseless intrepidity of Gen. Banks himself during the whole of the engagement. He was in the front, and exposed as much as any man in the command. His example was of the greatest benefit, and he merits and should receive the commendation of his government. Generals Williams, Augur, Gorman, Crawford, Prince, Green, and Geary, behaved with conspicuous gallantry. Augur and Geary were severely wounded, and Prince, by losing his way in the dark while passing from one flank to the other, fell into the hands of the enemy. I desire publicly to express my appreciation of the prompt and skilful manner in which Gens. McDowell and Sigel brought forward their respective commands, and established them on the field, and of their cheerful and hearty cooperation with me
orrespondence. U. S. S. Oneida, near Vicksburgh, May 18th, 1862. To the Authorities of Viccksburgh: The undersigned, with orders from Flag-Officer Farragut and Major-General Butler, respectively, demand, in advance of the approaching fleet, the surrender of Vicksburgh and its defences to the lawful authority of the United States, under which private property and personal rights shall be respected. Respectfully yours, S. Phillips Lee, U. S.N., Commanding Advance Naval Division. T. Williams, Brigadier-General. Mayor's office, Vicksburgh, Miss., May 18, 1862. To S. Phillips Lee, Commanding Advance Naval Division: Your communication of this date, addressed To the authorities of Vicksburgh, has been delivered to me. In reply, I will state to you that so far as the municipal authorities are concerned, we have erected no defences, and none are within the corporate limits of the city. But, sir, in further reply, I will state that neither the municipal authorities nor the ci
for picket and reconnoitring on that side of the town. In the next five or six days I hope to be in the possession of much information regarding the batteries, their approaches, and the forces in support. Respectfully, your obed't servant, T. Williams, Brigadier-General Volunteers Commanding. P. S.--Lieutenant Elliott's Brigade Quartermaster goes down for supplies, and can furnish details not given here. headquarters Second brigade, below Vicksburgh, July 6, 1862. Captain: The Ten most sanguine and even enthusiastic. I regard the cut-off to be my best bower. Should it fail me, I shall resort to the next best — to seize and hold the enemy's batteries, or at least spike their guns. Respectfully, your obed't servant, T. Williams, Brigadier-General of Volunteers. P. S.--The reconnoissance of to-day has shown how we ought not to approach the batteries; that of to-morrow will probably give the affirmative side. Running the Vicksburgh forts. The annexed lette