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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 25, 1865., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for W. A. Williams or search for W. A. Williams in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 6 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Heroes of the old Camden District, South Carolina, 1776-1861. an Address to the Survivors of Fairfield county, delivered at Winnsboro, S. C., September 1,1888. (search)
t or recklessness. Tarleton, it is true, is inclined to acquit Sumter of blame in this affair, and to attribute his own success somewhat to fortunate circumstances. Tarlelon's Memoirs, p. 115. Cornwallis reached Charlotte, but just as he was prepared to advance into North Carolina he received the unwelcome news of our great victory at King's Mountain. Would that we had the time to recall here again to-day the deeds and glories of the heroes of that great victory, Campbell, Cleveland, Williams, Sevier and Shelby. But did time allow, it would be but to repeat the story so recently and so eloquently told by the great Virginia orator, Daniel. The security of his conquest in South Carolina thus threatened by the sudden incursions of the mountain warriors, and endangered by the activity of Sumter, Marion and Pickens, Cornwallis was compelled to fall back and retreated to this place, Winnsboro, from which he might watch the threatened points of Camden, Granby and Ninety-Six. His h
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Diary of Major R. C. M. Page, Chief of Confederate States artillery, Department of Southwest Virginia and East Tennessee, from October, 1864, to May, 1865. (search)
his company (Lynch's). November 23d, 1864.—Eyes so inflamed by cold and wind could not bear the light. Rode in a wagon with the wounded, head wrapped up in a blanket. Awful road. Arrived at Mrs. Poague's, Bull's Gap. General Breckinridge and staff returned to Wytheville. Va. November 24th, 1864.—Arrived at a farmer's house between Blue Springs and Greenville, Greene county, Tennessee. Remained there that night. November 25th, 1864.—Reached Greenville and stayed at the house of Mrs. Williams. Was informed that General Morgan was sleeping at this house when he was surprised and killed in the back yard. Dangerous to be alone in this part of the country, as it swarms with bushwhackers and deserters from both armies. November 26th, 1864.—Arrived at Rheatown, Greene county, Tennessee. November 27th, arrived at Jonesboro, where I took train, arriving at Wytheville, Va., November 28th, 1864, and remained at Mrs. Dowdall's on account of sore eyes. Her son, Theodore, since dea
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A Narrative of the service of Colonel Geo. A. Porterfield in Northwestern Virginia in 1861-1861, (search)
filled the position I had because I had been ordered to do so. I would at the first have preferred it had been given to some one else. The Confederate authorities had at last become aware of the real condition of affairs in northwestern Virginia, and now sent General Garnett, with about five thousand of the best troops about Richmond; infantry, artillery and cavalry, equipped in every respect, and a number of experienced officers to assist him. Among them were Corley, DeLagnel, Pegram, Williams and Jackson, all of whom had lately resigned from the United States army. He stationed the First Georgia, Colonel Ramsay, at Laurel Hill; Twenty-third Virginia, Colonel Taliaferro, at Laurel Hill; Twenty-seventh Virginia, Colonel Fulkerson, at Laurel Hill; Thirty-first Virginia, Lieutenant-Colonel Jackson, at Laurel Hill; Lieutenant-Colonel Hansborough's battalion at Laurel Hill; six pieces of artillery at Laurel Hill; Twentieth Virginia regiment, Colonel Pegram, at Rich Mountain; Twenty
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Wee Nee volunteers of Williamsburg District, South Carolina, in the First (Hagood's) regiment. (search)
s, being in their turn driven back. The enemy either rallied or were reinforced. The woods were very thick, and the Forty-seventh regiment became separated in marching through. Captain Cone's company, upon getting out of the woods, discovered a body of men near by. An officer beckoned them on. Captain Cone, mistaking them for friends, approached with his company, when fire was opened on him and fifteen of his men were shot down and the captain wounded. The fight became very severe. Captain Williams' company and Captain Cone's were almost annihilated. The Forty-seventh then drew off, leaving their dead and many of their wounded in the hands of the enemy. Hagood and McHenry were entirely successful on the right. They drove the enemy before them, killing a good many without any loss on their part. The Eutaws remained in the trenches till half-past 2 o'clock the next morning, when they were ordered forward to meet the enemy, reported advancing. We marched to the cross-roads, wher
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of Chickamauga, 19th and 20th of September, 1863. (search)
d so until about 4 o'clock P. M. without relief or reinforcements; but we drove the enemy nearly half a mile, and were only stopped when we encountered him in large force in the strong position mentioned. And, though we did not succeed in forcing this position, the enemy eagerly availed himself of the cover of night to retreat from it. A list of casualties is herewith submitted. It will be seen that the losses in the regiment were heavy. Among the gallant men who fell that day was Captain W. A. Williams, Company F, who was acting major of the regiment when he was killed. He was an excellent officer and an estimable man, and his death is a serious loss not only to his company, but to the regiment. Among the most seriously wounded were Lieutenants Pitts and Cunningham, each of whom lost a leg by amputation. They are, therefore, unfortunately lost to the service. Captains Richardson and Swygort and Lieutenant Johnson were severely wounded. Captain Todd, acting Lieutenant-Colonel,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
. E., 91. Wilcox, Gen C. M, 262. Wilderness, Battle of the, 15, 21. Willey, Col. 85. Wilkinson, C. S. Navy, Capt., 106. Williamsburg, Battle of, 16 Williams, 88: Lt John J., 214; M., 162; Capt., 141. Williams, Col Benj , 12 Williams, Capt. W. A., killed, 379. Williamson, James, 8. Williamsport, Md., 27. WiWilliams, Col Benj , 12 Williams, Capt. W. A., killed, 379. Williamson, James, 8. Williamsport, Md., 27. Williston S. C., Reunion of Co. A, Gregg's Regiment at, 1882, 246. Wilmington, N. C., 4. Wilson, Capt., 22. Wilson, D. D., Rev. Robert. 396, 416. Winchester, Battle of, 444. Winder, Gen., Chas. S., 15. Winder, Gen. John H , 273. Winkler, D. D., Chaplain E. T., 180. Winn, Col., John. 13. Winn, Gen., Richard, 7, 10Williams, Capt. W. A., killed, 379. Williamson, James, 8. Williamsport, Md., 27. Williston S. C., Reunion of Co. A, Gregg's Regiment at, 1882, 246. Wilmington, N. C., 4. Wilson, Capt., 22. Wilson, D. D., Rev. Robert. 396, 416. Winchester, Battle of, 444. Winder, Gen., Chas. S., 15. Winder, Gen. John H , 273. Winkler, D. D., Chaplain E. T., 180. Winn, Col., John. 13. Winn, Gen., Richard, 7, 10, 13. Winnsboro, S. C., 3, 12, 13, 30. Winslow. Major, 70. Winyah Bay. 131. Wise, Gov. Henry A, 358. Withers, Gen , 298, 310, 317. Women of the South; their devotion and sacrifices. 290. Wood, Lt. F. C., 60. Wood, Gen., 309. Wood, Gen. S. A. M.,368. Wood, Col. W. B., 368. Woods, Hon., Samuel, 87. Woodford, Col Wm