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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The ram Tennessee at Mobile Bay. (search)
casualties on board the Tennessee were two killed and nine wounded. Her armor was never penetrated, although she was under the heaviest fire for nearly four hours. One solid 15-inch shot struck her shield, at point-blank range, between two of the ports and caused an indentation of about twelve inches, but did not break the iron plating. The Board of Survey appointed by Admiral Farragut, and consisting of Captain T. A. Jenkins, Captain James Alden, Commander W. E. Le Roy, and Chief-Engineer Thomas Williamson, reported in part as follows on the injuries received in the action, by the Tennessee. On the port side of the casemate the armor is also badly damaged from shot. On that side nearly amidship of the casemate, and between the two broadside guns, a 15-inch solid shot knocked a hole through the armor and backing, leaving on the inside an undetached mass of oak and pine splinters, about three by four feet, and projecting inside of the casemate about two feet from the side. Thi
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 44: battle of Mobile Bay. (search)
ivision after Lieutenant Adams was wounded, is spoken of to me very highly. Acting-Assistant-Engineer McEwan is also strongly noticed in the report of Chief-Engineer Williamson. He lost his right arm while busily employed on the berth-deck, where he was stationed, in assisting and comforting the wounded. He is spoken of by hisely manned by marines, who, under the direction of Captain Charles Heywood, performed most efficient service. Thanks to the unremitting supervision of Chief-Engineer Williamson, all had been so thoroughly prepared in his department that nothing was required of the engines during the day which they could not perfectly perform. n to the conduct of Sailmaker T. C. Herbert, whose conduct and cool courage is spoken of as most remarkable. P. Drayton, Captain. From Report of Chief-Engineer Thomas Williamson, U. S. S. Hartford: Sir — The conduct of the officers and men belonging to the engineer's department was characterized by coolness and energy dur
hly. Acting Third Assistant-Engineer McEwan is also strongly noticed in the report of Chief-Engineer Williamson. He lost his right arm while busily employed on the berth-deck, where he was stationeHeywood, performed most efficient service. Thanks to the unremitting supervision of Chief-Engineer Williamson, all had been so thoroughly prepared in his department, that nothing was required of t was three men killed and three men wounded. I am, respectfully, your obedient servant, Thos. Williamson, Chief-Engineer U. S. N. Lieutenant Commander L. A. Kimberly, Executive Officer U. S. Flag G. B. Squadron. Captain T. A. Jenkins. Captain James Alden. Commander W. E. Le Roy Chief-Engineer Thomas Williamson. U. S. Steam-sloop Richmond, inside of Mobile Bay, August 13, 1864. sir: In obe servants, Thornton A. Jenkins, Captain. James Alden, Captain William E. Leroy, Commander. T. Williamson, Chief-Engineer. Rear-Admiral D. G. Farragut, Commanding W. G. B. Squadron, U. S. Flag-Ship
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore), Passage of the falls by the fleet. (search)
d not enable me to get the names of all concerned. The following are the names of the most prominent persons: Lieutenant-Colonel Bailey, Acting Military Engineer, Nineteenth army corps, in charge of the work. Lieutenant-Colonel Pearcall, Assistant. Colonel Dwight, Acting Assistant Inspector-General. Lieutenant-Colonel W. B. Kinsey, One Hundred and Sixty-first New-York volunteers. Lieutenant-Colonel Hubbard, Thirtieth Maine volunteers. Major Sawtelle, Provost-Marshal, and Lieutenant Williamson, Ordnance Officer. The following were a portion of the regiments employed: Twenty-ninth Maine, commanded by Lieutenant-Colonel Emmerson; One Hundred and Sixteenth New-York, commanded by Colonel George M. Love; One Hundred and Sixty-first New-York, commanded by Captain Prentiss; One Hundred and Thirty-third New-York, commanded by Colonel Currie. The engineer regiment and officers of the Thirteenth army corps were also employed. I feel that I have done but feeble justice to th
Thomas Williamson, an old offender, who was some time ago sentenced by the Hustings Court to the county jail for a short period, and also to serve a term (of one year, we think) in the penitentiary, having been discharged from the former, was yesterday transferred to the latter. We would that he were a shoemaker, as Col. Pendleton needs all such that he can get, to work for our soldiers.
Put in service. --Henry Jones and Thomas Williamson, two soldiers, while on a spred Act Saturday night, entered Susan Neadham's house and took possession of a ham of bacon and a bucket. Shortly after they were captured by watchman Crafton and partner and locked up the night. Yesterday morning the Recorder sent them to the Provost Marshal, to be returned to their command, certainly a much better disposition then sending them to jail to be tried for party larceny.
Confederate States District Court. --In Judge Halyburton's Court the following cases, members of Dement's First Maryland battery, were discharged under writs of habeas corpus yesterday: L. W. Jenkins, John R. Yates, F. T. Nelson, Thomas Williamson, Francis McWilliams, William L. Shelburn, Richard T. Richardson, J. Bernard Gardiner and James A. Dorsett. The habeas corpus cases of John N. Davis, (Nazarene,) George V. Perrie, John W. Tucker, J. W. F. Hatton. Henry C. Bowie, E. R. Berry, Thomas H. Sunderland, Eugene Worthington, George W. Basford, John M. Sutherland, H. D. G. C. Sergeant, John Campbell and Daniel W. Lloyd, also members of Dement's battery, were continued till to-day. The court thereupon adjourned till eleven o'clock this morning.