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George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 54 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 28 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 18 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 9 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 7, 1862., [Electronic resource] 8 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 8 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 7 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 8, 1863., [Electronic resource] 5 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Williamson or search for Williamson in all documents.

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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 7: (search)
impetuous valor exhibited on other fields, advanced rapidly on the enemy, facing a hail of grape, canister and musketry, and driving him from his intrenchments to the edge of the Labor-in-Vain swamp. The Eighth led the attack under command of the heroic L. M. Lamar, and suffered severely. Colonel Lamar was wounded and taken by the enemy, Lieut.-Col. John R. Towers and Lieutenant Harper were also captured, Maj. E. J. Magruder was seriously wounded, Captain Butler, Lieutenants Montgomery, Williamson and Blackwell were wounded, and 13 men were killed, 63 wounded, 6 missing and 15 taken prisoners. Of the Seventh, Lieut.-Col. W. W. White, commanding, was seriously wounded, Captain Hicks wounded, and 7 were killed, 60 wounded and 8 missing. On the following day, the 29th (battle of Savage Station), Anderson's Georgia brigade set out in line of battle to find the enemy, traversing his deserted camps and works. The First Georgia regulars, in advance, had a brisk engagement. The Tenth,
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 14: (search)
ame up at a rush and sent the enemy flying down the hill. All of these two brigades were now massed on the crest. Colonel Williamson, commanding the Federal column, sent in two more Iowa regiments. Three regiments of the Twelfth corps also entered into the fight, and (Williamson relates) unheeding the warnings of the soldiers who had already encountered the Confederates, marched up as if on parade, declaring they would show the Westerners how it was done, when Polk's and Lowrey's men opened a terrific fire on them. They stood manfully for a minute or two, said Williamson, when they gave way and came down like an avalanche, carrying everything before them, and to some extent propagating the panic among my regiments. General Cleburne meno close that many of Cleburne's men used pistols and rocks, finding the latter missiles effective in making prisoners. Williamson concluded he could not carry the hill without reinforcements, and in the lull Polk rapidly threw up slight intrenchment