hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 16 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Simson Williamson or search for Simson Williamson in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 5 document sections:

municate that night, [ got another small boat and a crew, and pulled down the river till I found the tug Dandelion, Captain Williamson, U. S.N., who informed me that Captain Duncan, who had been sent by General Howard, had succeeded in reaching Admirorrow or earlier, at his option) till he reaches the nearest parallel road to the railroad, on the south side, south of Williamson's swamp creek. He will follow this road till abreast of Station No. 10, (or Sevastopol,) where it is probable he will to-ward Wright's Bridge and the bridge at Eden Station (Jenks's Bridge) with a view to saving them, if possible. Colonel Williamson's brigade of General Woods's division reached the former in time to save much of the timber, but all the planking ackets. They were, however, driven back into the main works, and our line was established from the Savannah River, near Williamson's plantation, in advance of Pipe Maker's Creek, across the Charleston Railroad to the Central Railroad, a few hundred y
December 6. Reconnoissances were made to-ward Wright's Bridge and the bridge at Eden Station (Jenks's Bridge) with a view to saving them, if possible. Colonel Williamson's brigade of General Woods's division reached the former in time to save much of the timber, but all the planking and several of the trestles were already burned. He, however, constructed a foot-bridge and crossed over a small force which he pushed forward toward the railroad. A small detachment went as far as the Twenty-Mile Station and returned, skirmishing all the way. This brigade skirmished considerably with the enemy near night. Colonel Oliver's brigade, of Hazen's division, made the reconnnoissance to Jenks's Bridge, but found the bridge destroyed. I sent an officer, Lieutenant Harney, with a select party to strike the Gulf Railroad, but he found the bridge across the Cannoucher burned and the approaches were guarded by rebels, so that he was compelled to return without doing the work. Another p
ith some cavalry, succeeded in bringing to and capturing near the foot of Argyle Island, a rebel despatch-boat called the Ida, having on board Colonel Clynch of General Hardee's staff, with despatches for gunboats above. The boat was unfortunately set on fire and burned. On the eleventh, Geary's division was moved to the left, encountering some opposition from rebel pickets. They were, however, driven back into the main works, and our line was established from the Savannah River, near Williamson's plantation, in advance of Pipe Maker's Creek, across the Charleston Railroad to the Central Railroad, a few hundred yards from the junction of the two roads, connecting with the Fourteenth corps, Third division, on the right, First division in the centre, and Second division on the left. On the twelfth, Winnegar's battery, (four three-inch guns,) which had been placed in position at Tweedside, to command the channel between Argyle Island and the Georgia shore, drove back two gunboats
eciation of the gallantry and good conduct of all the officers and men of both regiments in this action, in which our loss was very severe, as the list of casualties will show. The Eighth Georgia led the attack, under command of the heroic Lamar, and suffered severely. Colonel Lamar was wounded and taken by the enemy, but has been recovered from them; Lieutenant-Colonel Towers and Lieutenant Harper taken prisoners; Major Magruder seriously wounded; Captain Butler, Lieutenants Montgomery, Williamson, and Blackwell, all wounded; and thirteen men killed, sixty-three wounded, six missing, and fifteen prisoners. The Third Georgia supported the Eighth. The casualties are Lieutenant-Colonel White, commanding regiment, seriously wounded; Captain Hicks wounded; and seven men killed, sixty wounded, and eight missing. I am satisfied that if I had been able to bring my whole brigade into action or been properly supported, the whole of that part of the enemy's works would have been taken and
for his skill and gallantry. Captain Garrison, commanding Twenty-eighth Georgia, was severely wounded at the head of his regiment. Captain Banning, Twenty-eighth Georgia regiment, was distinguished for his intrepid coolness, fighting in the ranks, with gun in hand, and stimulating his men by his words and example. W. R. Johnson and William Goff, Twenty-eighth Georgia, Sergeant J. L. Moore, privates W. A. Estes, J. S. Wingate, W. S. Walker, Isaac Hundley, Thomas Sudler, J. J. Gordon, Simson Williamson, Lieutenant B. A. Bowen, Lieutenant R. S. Tomme, Lieutenant L. D. Ford, First Sergeant Herring, Sergeant T. P. W. Bullard, Sergeant J. J. Adams, privates Mosely, McCall, J. M. Vause, J. Hutchings, Thomas Argo, J. S. Denniss, W. C. Claybanks, Joseph Herron, W. D. Tingle, and Corporal J. A. Lee, Thirteenth Alabama. The officers commanding the Twenty-seventh and Twenty-eighth Georgia regiments report that it is impossible for them to make distinctions, where so many acted with disting