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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 17 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 15 11 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 6 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 13 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 12 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 11 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 9 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 9 3 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 9 1 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 8 0 Browse Search
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p the railroad south of Woodsonville, General Hindman moved on that place, December 17th, with 1,100 infantry, 250 cavalry, and four pieces of artillery. Woodsonville is the railroad-station on the south bank of Green River, and was occupied by Willich's Thirty-second Indiana Regiment. Willich seems to have been an officer of merit; and his regiment of Germans, commanded in this affair by Lieutenant-Colonel Von Trebra, showed soldierly qualities. Having lost some pickets a few days before, tWillich seems to have been an officer of merit; and his regiment of Germans, commanded in this affair by Lieutenant-Colonel Von Trebra, showed soldierly qualities. Having lost some pickets a few days before, they were on the alert; and, on the approach of Hindman, threw out some companies as skirmishers. The Federal advance was in force on the north bank. The south bank was fringed with timber, in front of which were open fields, bordered by another forest. Through this Hindman advanced almost to the edge of the opening; but halted, while still concealed in the woods, three-quarters of a mile from the river. Von Trebra's skirmishers were driven in by a volley. Hindman's purpose was to decoy
of his contest in front of Shiloh Church. He says: Here I saw for the first time the well-ordered and compact Kentucky forces of General Buell, whose soldierly movement gave confidence to our newer and less-disciplined forces. Here I saw Willich's regiment advance upon a point of water-oaks and thicket, behind which I knew the enemy was in great strength, and enter it in beautiful style. Then arose the severest musketry-fire I ever heard, and lasted twenty minutes, when this splendid regiment had to fall back. Willich's regiment had received its baptism of fire from the Texan Rangers at Green River crossing, as narrated in these pages. It now accepted immersion in flame at the hands of troops under Cheatham and Gibson. General Polk led Cheatham's division, which had probably suffered the least disorganization of any command on the field, to its position, in support of Breckinridge's left, as Cheatham says. This was, as near as can be ascertained, the left centre of
it arrived. As there were indications of a considerable force of the enemy on the Russellville road I decided to place the troops in line of battle, so as to be prepared for any emergency that might arise in the absence of the senior officers, and I deemed it prudent to supervise personally the encamping of the men. This disposition necessarily required that some of the organizations should occupy very disagreeable ground, but I soon got all satisfactorily posted with the exception of General Willich, who expressed some discontent at being placed beyond the shelter of the timber, but accepted the situation cheerfully when its obvious necessity was pointed out to him. Feeling that all was secure, I returned to my headquarters in the village with the idea that we were safely established in case of attack, and that the men would now have a good rest if left undisturbed, and plenty to eat, but hardly had I reached my own camp when a staff-officer came post-haste from Sturgis with th
earing the firing, proceeded to render assistance, and on their approach the enemy fled, leaving the lieutenant behind, after robbing him of his small arms and nearly all his clothing.--Baltimore American, December 18. Four companies of Colonel Willich's German Indiana regiment were attacked this afternoon on the south side of Green River, opposite Mumfordsville, Ky., by Colonel Terry's regiment of Texan Rangers, two regiments of infantry, and six pieces of artillery. Colonel Willich, on Colonel Willich, on being reinforced, drove the rebels back with a loss of thirty-three killed, including Terry, and fifty wounded. The National loss was eight privates and one lieutenant killed, and sixteen wounded.--(Doc. 229.) The bark Island City left Boston, Mass., for Fortress Monroe, Va., with two hundred and fifty of the rebels captured at Hatteras, who had been released from captivity at Fort Warren by the National Government. Last night a successful little movement occurred on the Cumberland Ri
January 26. A force consisting of Willich's Indiana regiment, Colonel Starkweather's Wisconsin regiment and a company of Indiana cavalry, Captain Gaddis, made a reconnoissance from Camp George Wood, near Munfordville, Ky., in the direction of the enemy. Willich's regiment and the cavalry penetrated to Horse Cave, on the LouWillich's regiment and the cavalry penetrated to Horse Cave, on the Louisville and Nashville Railroad, eight miles beyond Green River. Colonel Starkweather's regiment was placed in reserve about four miles out. Willich learned that Hindman had recently advanced with his brigade and had encamped only three miles beyond Horse Cave. The railroad track was destroyed in places up to and within five miles Willich learned that Hindman had recently advanced with his brigade and had encamped only three miles beyond Horse Cave. The railroad track was destroyed in places up to and within five miles of the national camp, and the turnpike was blocked up by trees which the rebels had felled across the road for a distance of four miles this side of Horse Cave. Several reservoirs of water, which they passed, filled the air for some distance around with stench arising from the decaying cattle and hogs the rebels had thrown into th
June 25. This afternoon, a fight occurred at Liberty Gap, Tenn., between a rebel divisions under General Cleburn, and the Nationals, commanded by Generals Willich, Wilder, and Carter, resulting in the rout of the rebels, who fled, leaving their dead and wounded in the hands of the Nationals. The loss of the Nationals was forty killed and one hundred wounded.--(Doc. 112.) The ship Constitution, in sight of the Island of Trinidad, latitude 20° 31′, longitude 29° 16′, was captured by the rebel privateer Georgia.--Fairfax Court-House, Va., having been evacuated by the National troops, was occupied by a rebel guerrilla party during the evening,--an expedition under the command of Colonel S. P. Spear, of the Eleventh Pennsylvania cavalry, reached a point within six miles of Richmond, Va., creating a great panic in that place.--(Doc. 35.) An assault was made on the rebel works at Vicksburgh, by General McPherson's corps, which ended in the capture of one of the forts.--(Doc.<
ridge to hold the ground while the troops on our right and left passed by. In a few moments General Willich, commanding a brigade of Johnson's division, reported to me that his brigade was in positiomy a mile and a half, was reassembled and took its position on the ridge road with Robinson and Willich. These dispositions being made, I sent orders to Generals Wood, Brannan, and Granger to with the Twentieth corps, under General Johnson, fell back to Rossville with the. Fourteenth corps, Willich's brigade forming the rear-guard. On the night of the twentieth, the Twentieth corps was in goended to their country and recommended to my superiors for promotion. Brigadier-General Aug. Willich, commanding First brigade. Second division, and Colonel W. W. Berry, Fifth Kentucky volunteers, backward; The reserves of the left divisions were, however, sufficient to recover the ground — Willich's brigade, of Johnson's division, being taken in with much effect. The attack travelling towar
hell coming in from Versailles, and attack the rebel cavalry at Middleton. The headquarters of the army was to be established at Mrs. McGill's, at Big Spring branch. All these movements were executed with commendable promptitude and success in the midst of a continuous and drenching rain, which so softened the ground on all the dirt roads as to render them next to impassable. General McCook's taking of Liberty Gap was very gallant and creditable to the troops of Johnson's division, Willich's brigade leading, supported by Carlin's brigade of Davis's division on the right. General Reynolds had the advance in the Fourteenth corps, Wilder's mounted brigade leading. He surprised and carried Hoover's Gap, a defile three miles in length, before the main infantry support of the rebels (two brigades) could come up, and when they did arrive, fought them and held the position until the remainder of Reynolds's division arrived. The enemy kept at artillery distance from them, and lef
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 4: campaign of the Army of the Cumberland from Murfreesboro'to Chattanooga. (search)
er by the divisions of Negley and Rousseau, of the same corps. Wilder was instructed to halt at Hoover's Gap until the infantry should come up, but finding it unoccupied he marched into it, captured a wagon-train and a drove of beeves passing through, and was pushing to the other extremity of it, when he was met by a heavy force of Confederates and pushed back. He held the Gap, however, until Reynolds came up and secured it. Meanwhile, McCook's troops, that turned toward Liberty Gap, with Willich's brigade in advance, soon encountered the Confederates. These were driven, their tents, baggage, and supplies, were captured, and the Gap was seized and held, against attempts to repossess it. While Rosecrans was securing these important mountain passes, other operations in accordance with his plan were equally successful. General Granger had started from Triune, on the extreme right, on the afternoon of the 23d, June, 1863. and sweeping rapidly on, encountering and pushing back the
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 5: the Chattanooga campaign.--movements of Sherman's and Burnside's forces. (search)
's crest, and cannon enfilading every gully. The orders to storm appear to have been quite simultaneous by Generals Sheridan and Wood, because the men could not be held back, hopeless as the attempt appeared to military prudence, with any prospect of success. The generals caught the inspiration of the men, and were ready themselves to undertake impossibilities and run fearful risks for the chances of glorious and undying gains. General Hazen, in a letter to the author, says: The men of Willich's and my brigades commenced running forward for security under the Ridge, but as they reached it they commenced its ascent. I then gave the order, Forward! and sent my staff officers to carry everybody forward up the Ridge. The fire we passed through was dreadful, but the men, without preserving lines, formed into groups where accidents of the ground gave cover, and each group, led by a color, steadily made its way up. These colors were often shot down — those of the First Ohio six times
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