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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 17 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 15 11 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 6 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 13 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 12 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 11 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 9 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 9 3 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 9 1 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. You can also browse the collection for Willich or search for Willich in all documents.

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p the railroad south of Woodsonville, General Hindman moved on that place, December 17th, with 1,100 infantry, 250 cavalry, and four pieces of artillery. Woodsonville is the railroad-station on the south bank of Green River, and was occupied by Willich's Thirty-second Indiana Regiment. Willich seems to have been an officer of merit; and his regiment of Germans, commanded in this affair by Lieutenant-Colonel Von Trebra, showed soldierly qualities. Having lost some pickets a few days before, tWillich seems to have been an officer of merit; and his regiment of Germans, commanded in this affair by Lieutenant-Colonel Von Trebra, showed soldierly qualities. Having lost some pickets a few days before, they were on the alert; and, on the approach of Hindman, threw out some companies as skirmishers. The Federal advance was in force on the north bank. The south bank was fringed with timber, in front of which were open fields, bordered by another forest. Through this Hindman advanced almost to the edge of the opening; but halted, while still concealed in the woods, three-quarters of a mile from the river. Von Trebra's skirmishers were driven in by a volley. Hindman's purpose was to decoy
of his contest in front of Shiloh Church. He says: Here I saw for the first time the well-ordered and compact Kentucky forces of General Buell, whose soldierly movement gave confidence to our newer and less-disciplined forces. Here I saw Willich's regiment advance upon a point of water-oaks and thicket, behind which I knew the enemy was in great strength, and enter it in beautiful style. Then arose the severest musketry-fire I ever heard, and lasted twenty minutes, when this splendid regiment had to fall back. Willich's regiment had received its baptism of fire from the Texan Rangers at Green River crossing, as narrated in these pages. It now accepted immersion in flame at the hands of troops under Cheatham and Gibson. General Polk led Cheatham's division, which had probably suffered the least disorganization of any command on the field, to its position, in support of Breckinridge's left, as Cheatham says. This was, as near as can be ascertained, the left centre of