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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 17 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 15 11 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 6 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 13 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 12 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 11 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 9 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 9 3 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 9 1 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Willich or search for Willich in all documents.

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ts — being no less than the meeting, routing and utter discomfiture, by an inferior force of infantry and two sections of artillery, of the dreaded General Forrest and his active brigade of cavalry. For some days, Gen. Forrest (brigadiered for his successful raid on Murfreesboro) has been hovering around Lebanon, Nashville, and Murfreesboro, awaiting the napping of another squad of Union generals, colonels, etc. His brigade consisted of Col. Lawton's, formerly Terry's Texan Rangers, whom Willich fought at Munfordsville; Colonel Smith's----Tennessee, Col. Horton's Second, and the First regiment of Georgia; an Alabama regiment, and a Kentucky squadron — all cavalry — all of whom were with him at the battle of the Little Pond, of which I write. Gen. Hascall's and Col. Wagner's brigades of Gen. Wood's division are encamped two miles from McMinnville, on the railroad to Manchester. On the morning of the thirtieth ultimo, it was learned that Forrest's brigade was encamped six miles fro<
of this had been felled, and forms an abattis in front of the intrenchments. Beyond the woods is another open space, which was the scene of the battle between Col. Willich and Terry, in December last. To the right and left of the intrenchments are extensive open fields of undulating surface, extending on the left to Woodsonvilleirst attacked, but they did not fall back until five o'clock. It is noteworthy that the rebels made their first attack at the same point at which they attacked Col. Willich. As soon as it was light enough to see their way, the rebels pushed forward, confident of success, and drove the picket-guard through the woods and into the i hundred. We have taken ono hundred and ten stand of small arms and two pieces of artillery, six-pounders. Thus, upon the field made glorious by the Indianians, under Willich, have Indianians won the second battle of Munfordsville, and, in shedding lustre on the national arms, added new honors to the State from which they hail.