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Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 6.. You can also browse the collection for George E. Willis or search for George E. Willis in all documents.

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Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 6., The Lawrence Light Guard.—Continued. (search)
robably the first one in town set at the street curb for public use. Mr. Hyde had a dispute with the town about the street line, and every few years would fence off a portion of the roadway. He finally received payment for what he claimed. George E. Willis, tin ware manufacturer, put up a building on these premises, using one-half of the lower floor for his business and living over his shop. William Parker, carriage trimmer, occupied the other half. Later Henry Forbes succeeded Mr. Willis, tMr. Willis, the latter going to the New England Gas Works at East Cambridge. The next building was the old Admiral Vernon Tavern, occupied by Benjamin Parker in our day for a dwelling, and it was the place of business of his sons, Benjamin, a mason, Gilbert, who had a job wagon, and Timothy and William, harness makers. There was a stone cutters' yard, shaded by a large poplar tree, between the house and Swan street. At different times the proprietors were Mr. Ridgley, Samuel Cady and Mr. Cabot. Rough
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 6., The Baptist Church of Medford. (search)
than Barker occupied part of the dwelling. Mr. George Lynne's Symmes. house, blacksmith shop and stable came next and were also destroyed. The Misses Tufts' dwelling and Richard Tufts' wheelwright shop on the same side were also laid in ashes. On the opposite side of Main street the fire commenced at the bridge with the dwelling of Nathan W. Wait, and swept down Daniel Lawrence's store and dwelling house Jas. Hyde's dwelling and store, Elias Tufts' wheelwright shop and dwelling, George E. Willis' tinware shop and dwelling, Mitchell's barber shop and dwelling, Benj. Parker's dwelling and stable, Moses Merrill and Son's paint shop, and Hartshorn's harness shop (all in one building). A ten-footer, occupied by an Irish family and three stables, were all totally destroyed. The conflagration swept on before a strong northwest wind until about twelve o'clock, when it came to the lumber yard of Oakman Joyce, two-thirds of which was destroyed, when its progress was checked. The old