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The Daily Dispatch: April 13, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: April 13, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for William R. Willis or search for William R. Willis in all documents.

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The Daily Dispatch: April 13, 1861., [Electronic resource], Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch. (search)
to attend one characterized by so much harmony, and, as above stated, so spirited. After the adjournment of the meeting, notice was given that a secession pole would be raised. The crowd immediately retired to the spot, and we soon had the pleasure of seeing the banner of the Confederated States floating in the breeze. I have not the time or space to give a description of the eloquent speeches delivered on the occasion by Messrs. James Barron Hope, Thos. Tabb, B. P. Lee, Jr., and Wm. R. Willis. I have rarely witnessed such enthusiasm as was manifested by the large crowd in attendance. Lieut. Latimer, commanding a squad of the "Wythe Rifles," saluted the flag, firing "a round" for each seceded State. To-day we heard a Union flag would be raised in another part of the town. About two o'clock our attention was called to a flag with the motto, "the Constitution and the Union"on one side of it; we cannot say what was on the other. But of one thing we are certain, befor
part of the people. The subject is not a dry one, even for a newspaper man, yet want of space compels us to dismiss it with the remark that the river yesterday experienced a collapse sufficient to lower its surface eight feet. The effects of the present freshet have been particularly disastrous on the South side of the river, opposite Richmond. The valuable and highly cultivated lands lying on its margin are now all overflowed, the dykes constructed for the especial purpose of keeping the tides out having given away under the heavy pressure, and the angry flood now cover thousands of acres of the very best land the lower Virginia, entirely destroying the crops, and destroying all chance for pitching a crop there this year. The low-lands of the following gentlemen in Chesterfield have been flooded, viz: J. B. Jones, T. V. Burgess, Henry Cox, Dr. John Howlett, the Messrs. Friend, Boulware, Fenoley, Gregory, Willis, A. H. Drewry, and others. The destruction of crops will be heavy.