hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 8 results in 2 document sections:

stant Quartermaster, Charles Lorch; Drum Major, William Kaufman; Bugle Major, Paul Gruchlin. Company A--Captain, Lorenz Meyer; 1st Lieut., William Knecht; Ensign, Herman Stoeckel. Company B--Captain, Anthony Brecklin; 1st Lieut., Franz Munich; Ensign, Fritz Letzeiser. Company C--Captain, Charles Hochleitner; 1st Lieut., Otto Hoym; Ensign, Gustav Lorens. Company D--Captain, J. W. Einbigler; 1st Lieut., William Drackers; Ensign, Conturier Charles. Company E--Captain, Ernst Otto Bernet; 1st Lieut., Henry Clober; Ensign, Chares Voelker. Company F--Captain, Charles Semsey; 1st Lieut., Herman Benecke; Ensign, Rudolph Beutler. Company G--Captain, William Schoen; 1st Lieut., William Syring; Ensign, Jacob Pabst. Company H--Captain, William Yon Doehr; 1st Lieut., William Schul; Ensign, Robert Merkle. Company I--Captain, Henry Stumpf; 1st Lieut., Adolph Wilson; Ensign, George Koenig. Company K--Captain, Joseph Hoeffling; 1st Lieut., Wm. Hafner; Ensign, Louis Kroeck.--N. Y. Tribune, June 14.
, temporal or spiritual, and return you to your homes — conquerors for humanity's sake, your country's sake,--conquerors for Christ's sake. Amen. Reply of Colonel Wilson. Colonel Wilson received the banner from the hands of Mrs. George Strong, and, carrying it into the ranks, gave it into the hands of the color-sergeant. CoColonel Wilson received the banner from the hands of Mrs. George Strong, and, carrying it into the ranks, gave it into the hands of the color-sergeant. Colonel Wilson and the color-sergeant then returned to the foot of the steps, both grasping the banner of liberty. The Colonel seemed deeply affected, and his utterance was choked for some time. His wife stood on the stoop, regarding him with tearful emotion. At length he summoned courage and spoke as follows:-- I can hardly sColonel Wilson and the color-sergeant then returned to the foot of the steps, both grasping the banner of liberty. The Colonel seemed deeply affected, and his utterance was choked for some time. His wife stood on the stoop, regarding him with tearful emotion. At length he summoned courage and spoke as follows:-- I can hardly speak; utterance has been taken from me. When I see my wife, when I see the ladies of New York city, who have done so much, I have to say of that flag that I love it better than my wife or child; better than I love her, my wife, do I love the honor of that flag. For my God first, for my country next, and for my family next. (Chee