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Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), April 7-12, 1862.--raid on Confederate line of communications between Chattanooga, Tenn., and Marietta, Ga. (search)
y and to prepare for death, but this was refused them. The rope was readjusted and the execution at once proceeded. Among .those who thus perished was Private Alfred Wilson, Company C, Twenty-first Ohio Volunteers. He was a mechanic, from Cincinnati, who, in the exercise of his trade, had traveled much through the States Nort Please inform us of your decision as soon as convenient. W. W. Brown, Wm. Knight, Elihu Mason, Jno. R. Porter, Wm. Bensinger, Robt. Buffum, mark Wood, Alfred Wilson, Twenty-first Ohio Regiment. Wm. Pittenger, Second Ohio Regiment. Wm. H. Reddick, Jno. Wollam, D. A. Dorsey, M. J. Hawkins, Jacob Parrott, Thirty-third Ohio . Jacob Parrott. 11. William Knight. 4. D. A. Dorsey. 12. Robert Buffum. 5. W. Bensinger. 13. William Pittenger. 6. J. R. Porter. 14. David Fry. 7. Alfred Wilson. 15. J. J. Barker. 8. Mark Wood.     Bridge-Burners. 16. T. McCoy. 21. R. White. 17. P. Pierce. 22. H. Mills. 18. B. Powers. 23. J. Tompkins.
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), April 29-June 10, 1862.-advance upon and siege of Corinth, and pursuit of the Confederate forces to Guntown, Miss. (search)
y skirmishers of the enemy. Sharp firing soon ensued, and another company from the Eighth Illinois, under command of Captain Wilson, was thrown forward to support their comrades already engaged. A spirited combat ensued, in which several of our meners, contident of success by reason of the superiority of his numbers. To his disappointment, however, Captains Lieb and Wilson, of the Eighth Illinois, boldly advanced their companies, and after two rounds of musketry again drove him back discomfitbeing done on either side until the afternoon, when I re-enforced my skirmishers with one other company, commanded by Captain Wilson, from the Eighth Illinois Regiment, for the purpose of driving the enemy's pickets and obtaining a different positionne, with the evident intention of driving our pickets in, but the men, under the command of the gallant Captains Lieb and Wilson, of the Eighth Illinois Infantry, nobly maintained their position, and after firing two volleys at the enemy advanced and
ykes. 27. General Gillmore. 28. General Wallace. 29. General Garfield. 30. General Schofield. 31. General Sheridan. 32. General Kilpatrick 33. General Custer 34. General Buford 35. General Merritt 36. General Averill 37. General Torbert. 38. General Sedgwick. 39. General McPHERSON. 40. General Reynolds. 41. General Wadsworth. 42. General Sumner. 43. General Kearney. 44. General Lyon 45. General Birney. 46. General Mitchell. 47. General Reno. 48. General Grierson 49. General Rousseau. 51. General Wilson. 51. General Kautz. 52. General Stoneman. 63. General Pleasonton. u4. General Gregg. 56. Vice Admiral Farragut. 56. Rear Admiral Porter. 57. rear Admiral Foote. 58. rear Admiral Du Pont. 59 rear Admiral Dahlgren. 60 rear Admiral Goldsborough. 61 Commodore Winslow. 62. Lieutenant-commander Cushing. 63. General R. E. Lee. 64. General Stonewall Jackson. 66. General Ewell. 66. General Beauregard. 67. General Longstreet. 68. General Breckinridge. 69. General A. P. Hill. 70. General Fitzhugh
ykes. 27. General Gillmore. 28. General Wallace. 29. General Garfield. 30. General Schofield. 31. General Sheridan. 32. General Kilpatrick 33. General Custer 34. General Buford 35. General Merritt 36. General Averill 37. General Torbert. 38. General Sedgwick. 39. General McPHERSON. 40. General Reynolds. 41. General Wadsworth. 42. General Sumner. 43. General Kearney. 44. General Lyon 45. General Birney. 46. General Mitchell. 47. General Reno. 48. General Grierson 49. General Rousseau. 51. General Wilson. 51. General Kautz. 52. General Stoneman. 63. General Pleasonton. u4. General Gregg. 56. Vice Admiral Farragut. 56. Rear Admiral Porter. 57. rear Admiral Foote. 58. rear Admiral Du Pont. 59 rear Admiral Dahlgren. 60 rear Admiral Goldsborough. 61 Commodore Winslow. 62. Lieutenant-commander Cushing. 63. General R. E. Lee. 64. General Stonewall Jackson. 66. General Ewell. 66. General Beauregard. 67. General Longstreet. 68. General Breckinridge. 69. General A. P. Hill. 70. General Fitzhugh
L. P. Brockett, The camp, the battlefield, and the hospital: or, lights and shadows of the great rebellion, Part 2: daring enterprises of officers and men. (search)
ng of their hapless fate, were even then engaged in whiling away the time by playing euchre. No time for preparation was allowed --they were bid to say farewell to their comrades, and be quick about it --then were tied, carried out, and hung. One of their number, too ill to walk, was pinioned like the rest, and dragged off in this condition to the scaffold; while two, whose weight broke the ropes which suspended them, were denied another hour's respite for prayer. One of their number, Alfred Wilson, of the Twenty-first Ohio, did not hesitate, while standing under the gallows, to make a brief, manly, and patriotic address to the scowling mob who surrounded him. The remaining prisoners, now reduced to fourteen, were kept closely confined under special guard, in the Atlanta jail, until October, when, overhearing a conversation among their guards, they became convinced that they were to be hung, as their companions had been. This led them to devise a way of escape, which they carri
ng of their hapless fate, were even then engaged in whiling away the time by playing euchre. No time for preparation was allowed --they were bid to say farewell to their comrades, and be quick about it --then were tied, carried out, and hung. One of their number, too ill to walk, was pinioned like the rest, and dragged off in this condition to the scaffold; while two, whose weight broke the ropes which suspended them, were denied another hour's respite for prayer. One of their number, Alfred Wilson, of the Twenty-first Ohio, did not hesitate, while standing under the gallows, to make a brief, manly, and patriotic address to the scowling mob who surrounded him. The remaining prisoners, now reduced to fourteen, were kept closely confined under special guard, in the Atlanta jail, until October, when, overhearing a conversation among their guards, they became convinced that they were to be hung, as their companions had been. This led them to devise a way of escape, which they carri