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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 29 3 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 25 7 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 7 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 3 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 3 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 1 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
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ergy displayed by Lieutenant Commander Fitch, Captain Pennock, and Lieutenant Commander Phelps, General Rosecrans would have been left without provisions. To Captain Walke, Commander Woodworth, Lieutenant Commanders Breese, Greer, Shirk, Owen, Wilson, Walker, Bache, Murphy, Selfridge, Prichett, Ramsay, and acting volunteer Lieutenant Hoel I feel much indebted for their active and energetic attention to all my orders, and their ready cooperation with the army corps commanders at all times, which enabled them to carry out their plans successfully. The Benton, Lieutenant Commander Greer, Mound City, Lieutenant Commander Byron Wilson, Tuscumbia, Lieutenant Commander Shirk, Carondelet, Acting Lieutenant Murphy, and the Sterling Price, Commander Woodworth, have been almost constantly under fire of the batteries at Vicksburgh since the forty-five days siege commenced. The attack of the twenty-second of May by the Benton, Mound City, Carondelet, and Tuscumbia on all the water batteri
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Naval operations in the Vicksburg campaign. (search)
t into line at 7:30 A. M. of the 29th, steaming down to the Grand Gulf batteries, the Pittsburgh, Lieutenant W. R. Hoel, leading; then the Louisville, Lieutenant-Commander E. K. Owen; Carondelet, Lieutenant J. M. Murphy; Mound City, Lieutenant-Commander Byron Wilson (attacking the lower batteries); Lafayette, Captain Henry Walke; Benton (flag-ship), Lieutenant J. A. Greer, and Tuscumbia, Lieutenant-Commander J. W. Shirk; steaming slowly with a current of five or six knots, 150 yards apart and 1y had been occupied from time to time in detached bodies at other points. A cut-off, at the mouth of the Arkansas, ingeniously made by Selfridge in April, had contributed materially to the facility of operations at that place. In May Lieutenant-Commander Wilson in the Mound City effectually destroyed a water-battery at Warrenton. In June an attack was made on Milliken's Bend by Confederate troops from Arkansas under Taylor, and the garrison was driven from their works to the levee. At this
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Union vessels in the Vicksburg operations. (search)
t.-Com. T. O. Selfridge, 13 guns, 1 howitzer; Carondelet, Com. Henry Walke (action with Arkansas, July 15th, 1862), Lieut. J. M. Murphy (Steele's Bayou, Vicksburg, and Grand Gulf), 13 guns, 1 howitzer; May 15th, 1863, 11 guns; Cincinnati, Lieut.-Com. B. Wilson (Vicksburg, July, 1862), Lieut. George M. Bache (Arkansas Post, Steele's Bayou, Vicksburg, May 27th), 13 guns, 1 howitzer; Louisville, Com. B. M; Dove (Vicksburg, July, 1862), Lieut.-Com. E. K. Owen (Arkansas Post, Steele's Bayou, Vicksburg, and Grand Gulf), 13 guns, 1 howitzer; Mound City, Com. A. H. Kilty (St. Charles), Lieut.-Com. W. Gwin (Yazoo River Raid, Aug., ‘62), Lieut. B. Wilson (Steele's Bayou, Vicksburg, and Grand Gulf, Warrenton), 13 guns, 1 howitzer; May 28, ‘63, 11 guns; July 26, ‘63,13 guns; Pittsburgh, Act.V. Lieut. W. R. Hoel, 13 guns; Sept., ‘62,12 guns, 1 howitzer; May 18, ‘63, 13 guns; Dec., ‘63,14 guns. later iron-Clads.--Choctaw (turret), Lieut.-Com. F. M. Ramsay (Haynes's Bluff, Yazoo River, Yazoo
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 8.89 (search)
s Bridge. This order took the initiative away from Bragg, and put it in the hands of Thomas with his two divisions in line to crush the small Confederate force west of the river, and then with his supports, as they came, beat, in detail, the Confederate supports, delayed, as they must be, by the crossings and the distances to march. Croxton's brigade, of Brannan's division, met Forrest's cavalry on the Reed's Bridge road, and drove it back on the infantry-two small brigades under Ector and Wilson. These advanced with the rebel yell, pushed Croxton back, and ran over his battery, but were in turn beaten back by Brannan's and Baird's forces. Baird now began the readjustment of his lines, and during the confusion of the movement Liddell's (Confederate) division, two thousand strong, struck the brigades of Scribner and King, and drove them in disorder, capturing Loomis's battery, commanded by Lieutenant Van Pelt. Bush's Indiana battery was Crawfish Springs. From a photograph taken
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Mississippi flotilla in the Red River expedition. (search)
Act. V. Lieutenant E. Morgan, 4 24-pounder S. B. howitzers, 2 12-pounder rifled howitzers, 2 30-pounder Parrotts. Juliet, Acting Master J. S. Watson, 6 24-pounder S. B. howitzers. Other vessels. Lexington, Lieut. George M. Bache, 4 8-inch, 2 30-pounder Parrotts, 1 32-pounder. Black Hawk (flag-ship), Lieut.-Com. K. R. Breese, 2 30-pounder Parrotts, 8 24-pounder S. B. howitzers, 2 12-pounder rifled howitzers, 112-pounder S. B. howitzer, 2 Union repeating guns, 1 Parmenter battery gun. Benefit (naval transport), Lieut.-Com. S. W. Terry. Covington, Act. V. Lieut. George P. Lord, 4 24-pounder howitzers, 1 2-pounder howitzer, 2 30-pounder Parrotts, 2 50-pounder Dahlgren rifles. Ouachita, Lieut.-Com. Byron Wilson, 5 30-pounder Parrotts, 18 24-pounder S. B. howitzers, 15 12-pounder S. B. howitzers, 1 12-pounder rifled howitzer. Fort Hindman, Act. V. Lieut. John Pearce, 6 8-inch, 1 12-pounder howitzer. On the Mississippi River hospital-boat D. A. January. from a War-time sketch.
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 9: the Red River expedition. (search)
er S. L. Phelps; Pittsburg, Acting Volunteer Lieutenant W. R. Hoel; Mound City, Acting Volunteer Lieutenant A. R. Langthorne; Osage, Lieutenant-Commander T. 0. Selfridge; Neosho, Acting Volunteer Lieutenant Samuel Howard; Ouachita, Lieutenant-Commander Byron Wilson; and Fort Hindman, Acting Volunteer Lieutenant John Pearce. These were the armored vessels. The lighter boats consisted of the Lexington, Lieutenant George M. Bache; Cricket, Acting Master H. H. Gorringe; Gazelle, Acting Master Ch. On the 7th, he skirmished almost continually with an ever-increasing cavalry force, driving them before him, until he had passed Pleasant Hill two or three miles, when he found the main body of the Confederate horsemen, under General Green, at Wilson's farm, strongly posted. There a sharp struggle for two hours occurred, when the Confederates were driven to St. Patrick's Bayou, near Carroll's farm, nine miles from Pleasant Hill, and there Lee halted. His loss in the engagement was ninety-tw
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 10: naval engagement at South-West pass.--the Gulf blockading squadron in November, 1861. (search)
n, Henry Eagle; Surgeon, T. M. Potter; Lieuts., James E. Jouett, J. J. Mitchell. B. N. Wescott, James H. Spotts; Act.-Master's Mate, Charles W. Adams; Asst.-Surg., C. H. Burbank; Paymaster, L. Warrington; Midshipmen, Frederick Rodgers, George M. Brown, S. H. Hunt; Boatswain, William Black; Carpenter, Wm. H. Edgar; Gunner, William Carter; First Lieut. of Marines, C. D. Hebb. Steamer Richmond. Capt., F. B. Ellison; Lieuts., N. C. Bryant, A. B. Cummings, Robert Boyd, Jr., Edward Terry, Byron Wilson; Surgeon, A. A. Henderson; Asst.-Surgeon, William Howell; Paymaster, Geo. F. Cutter; Boatswain, I. T. Choate; Sailmaker, H. T. Stocker; Carpenter, H. L. Dixon; Gunner, James Thayer; Act.-Master's Mate, H. W. Grinnell; First Lieut. Marines, Alan Ramsey; Chief Engineer, John W. Moore; Asst.-Engineers, Eben Hoyt, J. L. Butler, Wm. Pollard, A. W. Morley, G. W. W. Dove, R. B. Plotts, C. E. Emery. Sloop-of-war Vincennes. Commander, Robert Handy; Lieut., John E. Hart; Surgeon, S. A. Engles
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 26: siege of Vicksburg. (search)
r as with withes. Overhanging trees joined together over the channel — and their branches were so low that steamers could not pass without having their smoke-pipes knocked down and all their boats and upper-works swept away. The current was running swiftly, for the vessels entered the cut before the water had reached its level. On the first day, not more than six miles was made, and this was only accomplished by all hands going to work and sawing or cutting away the obstructions. Colonel Wilson, an Army engineer, who directed all this kind of work, was a thoughtful, energetic man, and he conducted the operations in an intelligent manner, and though the vessels did not make very rapid headway, they did wonderfully well considering the difficulties. They all had to be carefully handled with hawsers around the bends, for the Yazoo Pass, following the example of the mother Mississippi, was as crooked as a ram's horn. On the second day, the vessels were so torn to pieces that no
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 27: expedition through Steele's Bayou and Deer Creek. (search)
r 10,000 men. A man who knew all about the country, and who gave his opinion that this was a favorable opportunity to get into the desired position in rear of the beleagured city, was employed to accompany the expedition as pilot; and at the start everything promised well. On the 14th of March, Admiral Porter started with the following vessels: Cincinnati, Lieutenant-Commander Bache; Louisville, Lieutenant-Commander Owens; Carondelet, Lieutenant-Commander Murphy; Mound City, Lieutenant-Commander Byron Wilson; Pittsburgh, Lieutenant-Commander Hoel; two mortar floats and four tugs. When the fleet came to the pass into which it was to turn, after having ascended the Yazoo, the entrance could scarcely be made out, so dense was the growth of the overhanging bushes and trees, but these the men cut away with cutlasses and axes, and a pass wide enough for three vessels abreast, showed itself, lined out by heavy trees, and through this the gun-boats followed one another in line, their le
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 28: passage of the fleet by Vicksburg and capture of Grand Gulf.--capture of Alexandria, etc. (search)
started in the following order: Benton (flag-ship) Lieutenant-Commander James A. Greer; Lafayette, Commander Henry Walke; General Price, Lieutenant-Commander Selim Woodworth; Louisville, Lieutenant-Commander E. K. Owen; Mound City, Lieutenant-Commander Byron Wilson; Pittsburg, Volunteer-Lieutenant Hoel; Carondelet. Lieutenant-Commander J. McL. Murphy, and Tuscumbia. Lieutenant-Commander J. W. Shirk. The tug Ivy was lashed to the Benton, three army transports were in the rear and the Tuscumbided, but the number was not mentioned in the returns. Rear-Admiral Porter, in his report, speaks in the highest terms of Commander Walke, Greer, Lieutenant-Commander Murphy, Lieutenant-Commanders Shirk and Owen, Lieutenants-Commanding Hoel and Wilson, some of whom had already distinguished themselves on the upper Mississippi. The remarks on this battle of Grand Gulf by military historians show how reluctant they are to give the Navy credit. The following quotation from a well known writer
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