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The Daily Dispatch: October 22, 1861., [Electronic resource] 10 0 Browse Search
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negroes to work it, for that is just what we want; for neither of us have got much, and therefore you are not to disappoint me, and if you want Mary Clark — which I understand you asked her to have you — I hope you will be taken prisoner and kept there forever. I am thinking of you all the time and dreaming at night; but dreams do go by contraries. Sometimes I dream of being at fishing frolics, but, alas! awake disappointed — though in hope it will not always be so. "Disappointment sinks the heart of mankind." "But a renewal of hope given consolation." The above transposition is taken from one of your letters that you wrote to have White in 1854, when John smith out you out and married her at old Rilly Pottsis which made you as mad as a her that wanted to go setting on her own eggs and was ducked in a tub of water for it. But stick to me sad I wont deceive you. Nothing further, dear George, but your real admirer, Emma Wilson. To George Lucas, at Fairfax, V
Wilson, of Massachusetts. --This vulgar Senatorial bully has raised a regiment in Massachusetts, and delivered a glorification speech upon the occasion of a flag presentation, in which he makes an allusion to the assault on a Massachusetts regitill lurks in the Yankee heart, and which no doubt has prompted the indignities which noble Maryland has since suffered. Wilson says in his speech; "Some of the men in my command were born on Massachusetts soil, and have the blood of the Puritans inhe Sea." "Some" Yankees and "many" foreigners fighting Northern battles, is the description of the whole army, as well as Wilson's regiment. They hate us with diabolical malignity, but are too cowardly to fight their own battles. As to Wilson, the bolical malignity, but are too cowardly to fight their own battles. As to Wilson, the vaporing braggart, he made such excellent time at Bull Run that we don't wonder he has been chosen to lead a regiment in the way the Yankee regiments usually go.