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towards Nottoway Court-House. The road was held after an engagement, which continued from 12 M. until dark, the enemy making repeated attempts to break through and rejoin his advance. He withdrew from General Lee's front at daylight on the 24th, leaving his dead and wounded on the field, taking the road to Hungary- town and Keysville. Gen. Lee is still following them. Very respectfully, &c., R E Lee, General. We have further accounts of the progress of the raiders, under Wilson and Kautz, up the Danville Railroad. After leaving Meherrin they proceeded on and reached Keysville, seventy- three miles from Richmond, about three o'clock on Saturday morning, and arrived at Drake's Branch, eighty-one miles from Richmond, at seven o'clock.--The depot buildings at both places were burnt, and as much damage done to the track as it was possible to effect as they proceeded. A dispatch received at the Danville depot yesterday morning states that about thirty-six miles of the
ome interesting particulars of the progress of Wilson's cavalry raid: Another flank movement. ese to a place of safety. We do not hear that Wilson's band met with any opposition at Burkesville,atly surprised to learn yesterday morning that Wilson's raiders had captured Rev. Dr. Pryor on Wednes was refused, and he was at once conducted to Wilson's Provost Marshal, who after a brief examinatints, entitled to a discharge on his parole. Gen Wilson heard the statement with patience, regrettedim at Headquarters. Dr. Pryor describes Gen Wilson as a fine looking man, about thirty years ofty which had attended them during this war. Gen. Wilson was very jauntily dressed in black velvet ptheir contents. Dr. Pryor informs us that Wilson is in supreme command, and he is accompanied bouse with the advance of the rebel column. Gen. Wilson received the communication with much appare give the invaders a bloody reception. Should Wilson extend his expedition to that section, it is i
--All quiet along the lines yesterday and to-day, save heavy cannonading for a while this morning on the centre, the result of which is unknown. There was a severe cavalry fight near Nottoway C. H., Thursday, between the rear column of Wilson's men and Dearing, which continued from two o'clock until dark, when the enemy retreated under cover of the darkness. Thirty-three prisoners were captured, and have been brought in. The enemy's loss is many killed and wounded. Our loss is s a severe cavalry fight near Nottoway C. H., Thursday, between the rear column of Wilson's men and Dearing, which continued from two o'clock until dark, when the enemy retreated under cover of the darkness. Thirty-three prisoners were captured, and have been brought in. The enemy's loss is many killed and wounded. Our loss is small. Wilson is stealing fresh horses and shooting his jaded ones. Our men report the road strewed with them. The damage to the Southside road is very great.
s of communication. [from our own correspondent.] Petersburg, Va, June 30 — 3 P. M. Wilson's contempt for the cavalry must surely heighten his respect for the infantry. Though our cavalrge to turn up wherever and whenever they can do us most harm. On Tuesday evening Hampton fought Wilson at Sappony Church, three miles from Stony Creek and sixteen miles from this place, and succeeded Reports from Petersburg. It was reported in Petersburg on Wednesday that a large number of Wilson's raiders had fallen into our hands, and this was repeated by prisoners who were brought in at hat the capture was made at or near Stony Creek, on the Weldon railroad. They also stated that Gen Wilson was with this brigade, and it is conjectured that he is among the captured. We took horseetersburg Express, of yesterday, has the following information of the thieving and plundering of Wilson's gang in the counties of Dinwiddie, Nottoway, and Lanenburg: From Mr. Robert Sydnor, an es
nt for Washington on Thursday last, reports that his regiment is lying within one mile of Petersburg, and his men in the rifle pits are close enough to hear bricks fall when an occasional shell strikes the chimneys of the houses in the city. Wilson's cavalry raid. A letter dated Bermuda Hundred, July 1--P M, says Gen Wilson and Kants's cavalry have just returned from their recent raid, having destroyed twenty-five miles of the Danville Railroad very effectually. On their return theGen Wilson and Kants's cavalry have just returned from their recent raid, having destroyed twenty-five miles of the Danville Railroad very effectually. On their return they encountered the enemy in strong force, and a heavy fight was the result, with considerable loss on both sides, and some captures of men, horses and guns. Lincoln's body Guard. The Washington Chronicle says that Lincoln went out to the Soldiers' Home, near Washington, on the 2d, and that, as was the custom last year, he will be attended in and out by the Union Light Guard of Ohio cavalry. Yankee Government for the States in rebellion As stated in the telegraphic summary yester
point Col Chapman, with the Second brigade of Wilson's own division, had a skirmish with a small fon, after which he rested for the night. Gen Wilson, who, with the remainder of his force, had bthis point having been clearly demonstrated, Gen Wilson dispatched Gen Kantz up a left hand road tow and ambulance trains of the whole force and Gen Wilson, having constructed a line of rifle-pits in lso, and was sharply engaged before daylight. Wilson, with the troops he had brought up from Stony ir are rather confused. But it appears that Gen Wilson, perceiving that his command was in danger o. The reports in regard to the facts of Gen Wilson and the party accompanying him are vague ande first information brought to headquarters of Wilson's position was by Capt Whitaker, of the first Connecticut, and Aide de Camp to Gen Wilson. He left Reams's station at 8 A M, of the 29th, with foater telegram announces the safe arrival of Gen. Wilson with the Third Division: The cavalry [2 more...]
Capture of an old runaway. --Among some prisoners captured a few days since from Wilson's raiders around Petersburg was a negro fellow named Joe Moss, belonging to Major Wm. Allen, of Sussex, now living in this city. Joe has been absent over two years. In response to a telegraphic dispatch, officer Moore went to Petersburg yesterday afternoon to bring the runaway over to Richmond.