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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 17 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for George P. Wilson or search for George P. Wilson in all documents.

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Speech from A wounded rebel.--The train from the East brought down Captain Wilson, of Atlanta, one of the wounded on the glorious battle-field of Manassas. Captain Wilson was in the whole of the hard-fought battle of the 21st, was wounded in the heel while on horseback, and received a contusion on the left shoulder from a canCaptain Wilson was in the whole of the hard-fought battle of the 21st, was wounded in the heel while on horseback, and received a contusion on the left shoulder from a cannon ball, which paralyzed his arm. Notwithstanding his sufferings from the pain of his wounds, he appeared on the platform of the cars, in response to the calls of the eager crowd assembled, and gave a glowing and eloquent description of the fight in which he had so gallantly participated. The statements of this brave eye-witnesstails of this great victory which we have received by the press and by the telegraph — a victory which has no precedent for completeness in the annals of war. Captain Wilson's narration moved the audience to alternate shouts of enthusiasm and tears of joy, as he graphically depicted either the noble conduct and gallant deeds of th
l to the rest of our heroes in the desperate struggle of the left wing. The officers, Captain Daniel M. Shriver, First Lieutenant John S. Mitchell, and Second Lieutenant John B. Lady, led with great gallantry, and the men followed with the determined courage of veterans in a successful charge of their regiment and others on one of the enemy's batteries, after sustaining for hours a storm of shot and shell in supporting one of our batteries. The loss of the company was two killed, Sergeant George P. Wilson and John Fry, (son of Judge J. L. Fry,) two it is feared mortally wounded, William Quarrier and John Sweeny, sen., and seven others wounded, but not dangerously. Among the latter is Lieutenant Lady, who, with private Frederick, also wounded, is now in the city, well cared for in a benevolent family. They have each a painful flesh wound in the shoulder. The wounds of others are slight. Messrs. Fry and Quarrier were young lawyers of fine promise. Capt. Shriver, a young gentleman
virtue, though he has it not? Is he disloyal or really patriotic under difficulties? What, of all things on this day, is under discussion? The Bill forbidding the return of fugitive slaves by our troops to disloyal owners. What! said Senator Wilson; shall we take these men who have been used to dig intrenchments. for masked batteries, behind which their traitorous masters are posted to murder our true loyal defenders — shall we force these poor men back to those traitorous masters, to o do mine. [Resumes his seat and the newspaper, which he turns over somewhat conspicuously toward the gentleman on the other side of the house. ] Pearce speaks, half-way, for Maryland. Mr. Clerk Forney presently calls the vote; Trumball, Sumner, Wilson, and others, responding an emphatic Ay; and the chairman remarks that the bill is passed --six Senators voting No. Mr. Tennessee Johnston then postponing his speech, we looked into the House, found the seats as full as usual, and business proc
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore), Incidents of the retreat after the panic was stopped. (search)
virtue, though he has it not? Is he disloyal or really patriotic under difficulties? What, of all things on this day, is under discussion? The Bill forbidding the return of fugitive slaves by our troops to disloyal owners. What! said Senator Wilson; shall we take these men who have been used to dig intrenchments. for masked batteries, behind which their traitorous masters are posted to murder our true loyal defenders — shall we force these poor men back to those traitorous masters, to o do mine. [Resumes his seat and the newspaper, which he turns over somewhat conspicuously toward the gentleman on the other side of the house. ] Pearce speaks, half-way, for Maryland. Mr. Clerk Forney presently calls the vote; Trumball, Sumner, Wilson, and others, responding an emphatic Ay; and the chairman remarks that the bill is passed --six Senators voting No. Mr. Tennessee Johnston then postponing his speech, we looked into the House, found the seats as full as usual, and business proc
ed them with bread, may be removed from the Rogues' Gallery. And your petitioners will ever pray. Blinky Riley. little Felix, alias Felix Duval, alias Thomas Wilkins. Jack Davis, alias Jack the Fiddler. mysterious Jimmy. sailor Jack alias Jack Harris. little Davis, alias Sammy Davis. long doctor, alias Bill Johnson. Isador Goldstein. George Velsor, alias Old Sheeny. Jim Patterson, alias La Grange, alias Fancy. Ed. Argentine, alias Burns, alias Osborne, alias Wilson. Jack carpenter, alias Murphy, alias Dobbs. White cloud. Ned Timpson. John Hickey, alias Spectacle Smith. Liverpool Jack. Cobbler Jack. Charley Fisher, alias Wagoner. Molly marches. Jimmy Clutes. Hans Williams, alias Blackhawk. Charley Crout. Jimmy, alias Boots and Shoes. Joseph Brown, alias Greenburg, alias Nigger. Jim Johnson, alias Halleck, alias Webb. Jack Smith, alias Hamilton, alias Fatty. Jack Hatfield, alias Williams, Chief Mourner.