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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Repelling Hood's invasion of Tennessee. (search)
nce the retreat from Pulaski began, and the little army had been exposed day and night to all sorts of weather except sunshine, and had been almost continually on the move. From deserters it was learned that Hood's infantry numbered 40,000, and his cavalry, under Forrest, 10,000 or 12,000. But the Union army was slowly increasing by concentration and the arrival of recruits. It now numbered at Columbia about 23,000 infantry and some 5000 cavalry — of whom only 3500 were mounted. General James H. Wilson, who had been ordered by General Grant to report to General Sherman,--and of whom General Grant wrote, I believe he will add fifty per cent. to the effectiveness of your cavalry,--had taken command personally of all General Thomas's cavalry, which was trying to hold the fords east and west of Columbia. [See article by General Wilson, to follow.] In spite of every opposition, Forrest succeeded in placing one of his divisions on the north side of Duck River before noon of the 28th
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Union cavalry in the Hood campaign. (search)
The Union cavalry in the Hood campaign. by James Harrison Wilson, Major-General, U. S. V., and Brevet Major-General, U. S. A. Bridge over the Cumberland at Nashville Until after Sheridan's victory of the Opequon, September 19, 1864, I hhem before he had consulted his officers, added, with a depth of feeling and emotion which he did not attempt to conceal: Wilson, they [:meaning General Grant and the War Department] treat me as though I were a boy and incapable of planning a campaige battle an hour and a half longer than the time of delay due to the fog which prevailed in the early morning. See General Wilson's report, Report of the Congressional Committee on the Conduct of the War, Supplement, Part I., pp. 409-422.--J. H. Wach doing his best to reach the Franklin turnpike that night so as to drive the now thoroughly disorganized Major-General James H. Wilson. From a photograph. enemy from his last line of retreat. Orders were also sent to Johnson to move rapidly
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at Nashville, Dec. 15-16, 1864. (search)
s; C, 1st Tenn., Lieut. Joseph Grigsby; D, 1st Tenn., Capt. Samuel D. Leinart; A, 2d U. S. Colored, Capt. Josiah V. Meigs. quartermaster's ]division (composed of quarter-master's employees), Col. James L. Donaldson. cavalry Corps, Brig.-Gen. James H. Wilson. Escort: 4th U. S., Lieut. Joseph Hedges. first division (Second and Third Brigades, under Brig.-Gen. E. M. McCook, absent in western Kentucky). First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. John T. Croxton: 8th Iowa, Col. Joseph B. Dorr; 4th Ky. (mon force and dismounted cavalry), viz.: Fourth Corps, 13,350; Twenty-third Corps, 8880; Detachment Army of the Tennessee, 9210; Steedman's Detachment, 5270; Cavalry Corps (mounted men), 6600, or an aggregate, including artilery, of 43,260. General J. H. Wilson says the cavalry numbered 12,000. The Confederate Army. Army of Tennessee.--General John B. Hood. Lee's Corps (Hood's), Lieut.-Gen. S. D. Lee. Johnson's division, Maj.-Gen. Edward Johnson. Deas's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Z. C. De
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Sheridan in the Shenandoah Valley. (search)
he ability of its infantry, in anything like equal numbers, to contend against our cavalry in the open fields of the Valley. On the night of the 16th Sheridan withdrew toward his base, and on the following day the cavalry marched, driving all the cattle and live stock in the Valley before it, and burning the grain from Cedar Creek to Berryville. No other private property was injured, nor were families molested. On the afternoon of the 17th the Third Division of cavalry, under General James H. Wilson, reported to General Torbert, chief-of-cavalry, who with it and Lowell's brigade and the Jersey brigade (Penrose's) of the Sixth Corps was ordered to cover the flank of the army which marched and took position near Berryville. General Early, who on the morning of the 17th discovered the withdrawal of Sheridan's force, pursued rapidly, Anderson advancing from Front Royal with his command. Early struck Torbert's force with such vigor and with such overwhelming numbers as completely
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Operations South of the James River. (search)
ening the cavalry was withdrawn, and the column was just fairly on the return when the noise of the assault so long expected broke upon us about four miles to our right. It was all over in a few moments, and, as we subsequently learned, General Smith had carried the entire line in his front. The Army of the Potomac began to arrive on the night of the 15th, and was on hand to support the Eighteenth Corps in the position it had captured. On the 20th I received orders to report to General James H. Wilson for the purpose of cooperating in his raid against the Danville Railroad. At 2 o'clock on the morning of the 22d the Cavalry Division of the Army of the James took the advance, with orders to proceed, via Reams's Station on the Weldon Railroad, to Sutherland's Station on the South-side Railroad. Reams's Station was captured at 7 in the morning, but General W. H. F. Lee with the Confederate cavalry was found to be encamped on our route to Sutherland's, and that route involved a batt
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The battle of the Petersburg crater. (search)
ront of the crater. 11. Frying-pan having bullet-holes; taken out of the crater. It was provided in General Meade's order for the movement that the cavalry corps should make an assault on the left. Two divisions of the cavalry were over at Deep Bottom. They could not cross the river until after the Second Corps had crossed, so that it was late in the day before they came up. Indeed, the head of the column did not appear before the offensive operations had been suspended. As General James H. Wilson had been ordered to be in readiness, and in view of the unavoidable delay of General Sheridan, orders were sent to Wilson not to wait for General Sheridan, but to push on himself to the Weldon railroad. But the length of the march prevented success; so no attack was made by the cavalry, except at Lee's Mills, where General Gregg, encountering cavalry, drove them away in order to water his horses. The Fifth Corps and the Eighteenth Corps remained inert during the day, excepting Tur
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Actions on the Weldon Railroad. (search)
enemies as they were, they were bone of our bone and flesh of our flesh. Thus ended the last and most reckless attempt to dislodge Warren. The total Union loss was 251 killed, 1148 wounded, and 2879 captured or missing = 4278. The Confederate loss is not officially stated.--editors. Ii. Reams's Station. Ever since the first investment of Petersburg both sides had appreciated the importance of the Weldon Railroad, and every attempt on our part was fiercely contested by the rebels. Wilson's cavalry raid was started off against that and the Lynchburg Railroad on June 22d by General Meade. [See p. 535.] Late in August, in view of the success of the Fifth and Ninth corps at Globe Tavern, it was determined to continue the work of destruction down on this much-fought — for railway. For this purpose Hancock was ordered over from Deep Bottom with two divisions to Reams's Station. He arrived there on the 22d, after a most fatiguing march, and set to work at once with his accustome
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., General Grant on the siege of Petersburg. (search)
On the 19th General Sheridan, on his return from his expedition against the Virginia Central Railroad [see p. 233], arrived at the White House just as the enemy's cavalry was about to attack it, and compelled it to retire. . . . After breaking up the depot at that place he moved to the James River, which he reached safely after heavy fighting. He commenced crossing on the 25th, near Fort Powhatan, without further molestation, and rejoined the Army of the Potomac. On the 22d [of June] General Wilson, with his own division of cavalry of the Army of the Potomac and General Kautz's division of cavalry of the Army of the James, moved against the enemy's railroads south of Richmond. [See p. 535.] . . . With a view of cutting the enemy's railroad from near Richmond to the Anna rivers, and making him wary of the situation of his army in the Shenandoah, and, in the event of failure in this, to take advantage of his necessary withdrawal of troops from Petersburg, to explode a mine that h
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 18.113 (search)
more than four years duration, which cost us hundreds of thousands of lives and thousands of millions of treasure, but which has conferred, even upon the defeated South, blessings that more than compensate the country for all her losses. Grand reviewing stand in front of the White House, Washington, May 23-24, 1865. from a photograph. Opposing forces in Wilson's raid, March 22d-April 20th, 1865. the Union forces. Cavalry Corps, Military Division of the Mississippi.--Brevet Maj.-Gen. James H. Wilson. Escort: 4th U. S., Lieut. William O'Connell. first division, Brig.-Gen. Edward M. McCook; (after April 20th) Brig.-Gen. John T. Croxton. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. John T. Croxton: 8th Iowa, Col. Joseph B. Dorr; 4th Ky. (Mounted Inf'y), Col. Robert M. Kelly; 6th Ky., Maj. William H. Fidler; 2d Mich., Lieut.-Col. Thomas W. Johnston. Second Brigade, Col. Oscar H. La Grange: 2d Ind. (battalion), Capt. Roswell S. Hill (w), Capt. Joseph B. Williams; 4th Ind., Lieut.-Col. Horac
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 18.114 (search)
Wilson's raid through Alabama and Georgia. see General James H. Wilson's article, the Union cavalry in the Hood campaign, p. 465.--editors. In the spring of 1865 the cavalry corps commanded by General James H. Wilson was encamped at Gravelly Springs and Waterloo, Alabama [see map, p. 414], on the north bank of the Tennessee, with a base of supplies at Eastport, Mississippi. The following condensation of General Wilson's report of June 29th, 1865, summarizes the final operations of his General James H. Wilson was encamped at Gravelly Springs and Waterloo, Alabama [see map, p. 414], on the north bank of the Tennessee, with a base of supplies at Eastport, Mississippi. The following condensation of General Wilson's report of June 29th, 1865, summarizes the final operations of his corps: On the 23d of February, 1865] General Thomas arrived at Eastport with instructions directing me to fit out an expedition of five or six thousand cavalry for the purpose of making a demonstration upon Tuscaloosa and Selma in favor of General Canby's operations against Mobile and Central Alabama. [See p. 411.] . . . The instructions of Lieutenant-General Grant, transmitted to me by General Thomas, allowed me the amplest discretion as an independent commander. The movement was dela
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