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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 4.14 (search)
nized, occupying the opposite side. The panic created by his first entrance within the outer works of Richmond having subsided, troops were sent out to attack his rear. He was now in a perilous position; one from which but few generals could have extricated themselves. The defenses of Richmond, manned, were to the right, the Chickahominy was to the left, with no bridge remaining, and the opposite bank guarded; to the rear was a force from Richmond. This force was attacked and beaten by Wilson's and Gregg's divisions, while Sheridan turned to the left with the remaining division and hastily built a bridge over the Chickahominy under the fire of the enemy, forced a crossing and soon dispersed the Confederates he found there. The enemy was held back from the stream by the fire of the troops not engaged in bridge-building. On the 13th Sheridan was at Bottom's Bridge, over the Chickahominy. On the 14th he crossed this stream, and on that day went into camp on the James River at H
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., General Grant on the Wilderness campaign. (search)
rack, two freight trains, and one locomotive, together with large quantities of commissary and other stores; thence, crossing to the South Side Road, struck it at Wilson's, Wellsville, and Black's and White's stations, destroying the road and station-houses; thence he proceeded to City Point, which he reached on the 18th. On thas immediately ordered by General Meade, along his whole line, which resulted in driving the enemy from a part of his intrenched skirmish line. On the 31st General Wilson's division of cavalry destroyed the railroad bridges over the South Anna River, after defeating the enemy's cavalry. General Sheridan, on the same day, reach of our intention, could reenforce the place. The movement from Cold Harbor commenced after dark on the evening of the 12th. One division of cavalry, under General Wilson, and the Fifth Corps crossed the Chickahominy at Long Bridge, and moved out to White Oak Swamp, to cover the crossings of the other corps. The advance corps
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Through the Wilderness. (search)
of the Rapidan River,which in general flows south-east. Hancock, preceded by Gregg's cavalry, crossed at Ely's Ford and moved to Chancellorsville, which placed him on the left, or south-east, side of the Wilderness battle-field. Warren, with Wilson's cavalry in front (and followed by Sedgwick), crossed at Germanna Ford and followed the Germanna Plank road, due south-east, to Wilderness Tavern. Sedgwick encamped for the night three miles south of the ford. The sixty-five miles of trains wewas warned by General Meade that the enemy had been met on the turnpike, and he was directed to halt at Todd's tavern until further orders. Meantime, Crawford's division of Warren's corps, between the turnpike and plank road, in advancing, found Wilson's cavalry skirmishing with what he supposed to be the enemy's cavalry. At 8 A. M., under Relative positions in the Wilderness, May 5: for the most part the troops are indicated by divisions, and when a name designates a brigade it is inclosed
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at the beginning of Grant's campaign against Richmond. (search)
ig.-Gen. David McM. Gregg. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Henry E. Davies. Jr.: 1st Mass., Maj. Lucius M. Sargent; 1st N. J., Lieut.-Col. John W. Kester; 6th Ohio, Col. William Stedluan; 1st Pa., Col. John P. Taylor. Second Brigade, Col. J. Irvin Gregg: 1st Me., Col. Charles H. Smith; 10th N. Y., Maj. M. Henry Avery; 2d Pa., Lieut.-Col. Joseph P. Brinton; 4th Pa., Lieut.-Col. George H. Covode; 8th Pa., Lieut.-Col. Samuel Wilson; 16th Pa., Lieut.-Col. John K. Robison. Third division, Brig.-Gen. James H. Wilson. Escort: 8th Ill. (detachment), Lieut. William W. Long. First Brigade, Col. Timothy M. Bryan, Jr., Col. John B. McIntosh: 1st Conn., Maj. Erastus Blakeslee; 2d.N. Y., Col. Otto Harhaus; 5th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. John Hammond; 18th Pa., Lieut.-Col. William P. Brinton. Second Brigade, Col. George H. Chapman: 3d Ind., Maj. William Patton; 8th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. William H. Benjamin; 1st Vt., Lieut.-Col. Addison W. Preston. artillery, Brig.-Gen. Henry J. Hunt. Artillery Reserve, Col
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at Cold Harbor. June 1st, 1864. (search)
Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Henry E. Davies, Jr.: 1st Mass., Lieut.-Col. Samuel E. Chamberlain; 1st N. J., Lieut.-Col. John W. Kester; 10th N. Y., Maj. M. Henry Avery; 6th Ohio, Col. William Stedman; 1st Pa., Col. John P. Taylor. Second Brigade, Col. J. Irvin Gregg: 1st Me., Col. Charles H. Smith; 2d Pa., Lieut.-Col. Joseph P. Brinton; 4th Pa., Lieut.-Col. George H. Covode; 8th Pa., Col. Pennock Huey; 13th Pa., Maj. Michael Kerwin; 16th Pa., Lieut.-Col. John K. Robison. Third division, Brig.-Gen. James H. Wilson. Escort: 8th Ill. (detachment), Lieut. William W. Long. First Brigade, Col. John B. Mcintosh: 1st Conn., Maj. George O. Marcy: 3d N. J., Col. Andrew J. Morrison; 2d N. Y., Col. Otto Harhaus; 5th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. John Hammond; 2d Ohio, Lieut.-Col. George A. Purington; 18th Pa., Maj. John W. Phillips. Second Brigade, Col. George H. Chapman: 3d Ind., Maj. William Patton; 8th N. Y., Maj. Edmund M. Pope; 1st Vt., Maj. William Wells. first Brigade, horse artillery, Capt. James M.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Sheridan's Richmond raid. (search)
o command the First Division, with General G. A. Custer, Colonel T. C. Devin, and General Wesley Merritt as brigade commanders; General D. McM. Gregg to the Second Division, with General H. E. Davies and Colonel J. Irvin Gregg to brigades; General J. H. Wilson to the Third Division, with Colonels J. B. Mcintosh and G. H. Chapman to brigades. To each division were attached two batteries of horse artillery, with the same number as a reserve. Sheridan's lieutenants were well chosen. Torbert har the nonce became horse-marines. On the 21st Sheridan, continuing his march to rejoin Grant, crossed the Pamunkey near White House, on the ruins Henry E. Davies, Jr. D. Mom. Gregg. Philip H. Sheridan. Wesley Merritt. A. T. A. Torbert. James H. Wilson. Sheridan and some of his Generals. Fac-Simile of a photograph taken in 1864. of the railroad bridge, after six hours work at repairing it, two regiments at a time working as pioneers. The only incident of the crossing was the fall of a p
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Sheridan's Trevilian raid. (search)
Sheridan was ordered to move to the relief of Wilson, who, returning from a raid on the enemy's raiached Prince George Court House, to learn that Wilson had returned within our lines. Wilson's smautler's army) of four regiments. On the 22d Wilson started under orders from Meade to cut the Welading division, but did interrupt the march of Wilson with his own division, under McIntosh. Pushing on, with the loss of seventy-five men, Wilson further destroyed the Southside road. At Burksville, on the 26th, Kautz inflicted great damage. Wilson found the bridge over the Staunton River in thest returned from Trevilian, was in his front. Wilson withdrew his train in the night, and headed foy handled. Upon reaching Reams's, Kautz, with Wilson's advance, found it in the possession of the ee Cavalry Corps at Lighthouse Point, July 2d. Wilson had been absent 10 days, had marched 300 milesthat had been received. At an inspection of Wilson's command, soon after its return, the Corps In[3 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., General Lee in the Wilderness campaign. (search)
e struggle, nearly simultaneously with that of Ewell's forces on the old turnpike. Thus was inaugurated a contest of many battles, in which the almost daily deadly firing did not cease for eleven long months. Heth's and Wilcox's divisions, under Lee's eye, maintained themselves well against the heavy assault of the Federal forces which greatly outnumbered them; Ewell's corps did good work on the old turnpike in its contest with Warren's corps, and Rosser's cavalry on the right had driven Wilson bask. Lee slept on the field not far from his line of battle, sending orders to Longstreet to make a night march and reach the front by daybreak on the 6th. On that morning serious disaster seemed imminent. Longstreet did not arrive in time to reenforce Lee's line of battle in the position it held at the close of the engagement of the preceding evening. Hancock's well-planned attack on our right forced the two Confederate divisions from their position, and it seemed at one moment that
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Land operations against Mobile. (search)
y and artillery, together with twenty-seven fieldpieces and all his transportation. The Union loss during these operations was 189 killed, 1201 wounded, and 27 captured,--a total of 1417. General Randall L. Gibson, the Confederate commander at Spanish Fort, reported a loss of 93 killed, 395 wounded, and 250 missing.--editors. Maury retreated to Meridian, the cavalry sent out from Pensacola to cut him off being prevented by high water from crossing the Alabama and Tombigbee. Meanwhile Wilson, with a reorganized and freshly equipped force of 12,500 cavalry, setting out from the Tennessee on the 18th of March, had completely defeated Forrest and taken Selma, with its fortifications, foundries, and workshops, on the 2d of April, and entered Montgomery on the day Canby gained Mobile. On the news of Johnston's capitulation Taylor surrendered to Canby, on the 4th of May, 1865, at Citronelle, all the remaining forces of the Confederacy east of the Mississippi; on the 26th Kirby Smit
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Cavalry operations in the West under Rosecrans and Sherman. (search)
ing along the north bank of the Tennessee, and on the 7th of November was joined by General Edward Hatch with a division. This body, numbering about three thousand men, kept a sharp lookout for indications of Hood's advance. On the 20th it became apparent that Hood was moving in the direction of Lawrenceburg Hatch skirmished with Forrest, and while the infantry under Schofield fell back from Pulaski to Columbia, Hatch also backed steadily until that point was reached. At Columbia General J. H. Wilson, who had been transferred from the cavalry corps of the Army of the Potomac and assigned to the command of all the cavalry in General Thomas's department, came up and took personal charge. [See p. 466.] The fame of Forrest, Morgan, and Wheeler was accented by the widespread heralding of all their exploits. On the other hand the services of the Union cavalry, being far southward and beyond the reach of newspapers, excited less notice; but for boldness and effectiveness, devotion t
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