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Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 3 (search)
ghting she had seen round the very house. Then there was a refreshment at Birney's Headquarters, where met Captain Briscoe (said to be the son of an Irish nobleman, etc., etc.); also Major Mitchell on General Hancock's Staff. The Russ was delighted with the politeness and pleased with the troops. Introduced to General Sheridan, the new Chief of Cavalry--a small, broad-shouldered, squat man, with black hair and a square head. He is of Irish parents, but looks very like a Piedmontese. General Wilson, who is probably to have a division, is a slight person of a light complexion and with rather a pinched face. Sheridan makes everywhere a favorable impression. Headquarters Army of Potomac April 18, 1864 I have seen some high-bush blackberries that already had wee leaves, just beginning to open; and the buds of the trees are swelling; and hundreds of little toads sing and whistle all night, to please other hundreds of Misses toads. The sap is rising so in the oak trees that the woo
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 4 (search)
Spotsylvania, an ill omen for us. The Rebels were there first and stood across the way. Warren attacked them, but his were troops that had marched and fought almost night and day for four days and they had not the full nerve for a vigorous attack. General Robinson's division behaved badly. Robinson rode in among them, calling them to attack with the bayonet, when he was badly shot in the knee and carried from the field. They failed to carry the position and lost a golden opportunity, for Wilson's cavalry had occupied Spotsylvania, but of course could not keep there unless the enemy were driven from our front. . . . A little before two we moved Headquarters down the Piney Branch Church road, south, to near its junction with the Todd's Tavern road. Meantime the 6th Corps had come up and formed on the left of Warren, the lines running in a general easterly and westerly direction, a mile and a half north of Spotsylvania. There was a high and curving ridge on which was placed our s
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), IV. Cold Harbor (search)
da Hundreds, with heavy reinforcements for this army. The Rebels, on their side, have been also bringing up everything — Breckinridge from the valley of the Shenandoah, Hoke from North Carolina, and everything from the South generally. . . . General Wilson's division of cavalry was sent out towards our rear and right, to cover that quarter and to continue the destruction of the railroads below Hanover Junction. General Sheridan, with the remaining cavalry, swung round our left flank and presseda bank and had many mishaps, so that they arrived only at ten. General Grant, however, had made a big fire, got a piece of board, lain down on it, with a bag under his head, and was fast asleep. At eleven, before getting to bed, we had news that Wilson's cavalry had forced the passage of the Chickahominy at Long's Bridge (the bridge was long since burnt) and that the pontoon was going down for the passage of the 5th Corps. Fain would I write more, but I am so stupid and sleepy that I am not eq
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), Index (search)
807, 313, 317, 345, 356; described, 307. Weld, Stephen Minot, Jr., 128, 211. Weldon railroad, 217, 224, 226, 23, 294. Wheaton, Frank, 91, 299; before Petersburg, 175, 177. White, Julius, 219. Wilcox's wharf, 163. Wilderness, the, 53, 89; battle of, 98. Wilkinson, Morton Smith, 75. Willcox, Orlando Bolivar, 212, 234, 310. Williams, Seth, 23, 60, 110, 123, 171, 221, 258, 270; on Sunday work, 28; brevet denied, 289; messenger to Lee, 354. Williams house, 173, 189. Wilson, James Harrison, 82, 104, 136, 156. Wingate, —, 357. Winthrop, Frederick, 800. Wise, Henry Alexander, 162, 361. Women in camp, 64, 65, 74, 75, 314, 317, 318; dinner party, 71; ultra-secessionist, 119; poor, 129. Woodruff, George, 315. Woodruff, Henry Dwight, 287. Woody's house, 140. Woolsey, Charles W., 253, 294. Wooten, Thomas J., 152, 187. Worth, William Scott, 64, 210, 318. Wounded, spirit of the, 71, 128. Wright, Horatio Gouverneur, 88, 90, 98, 108, 110, 111, 112, 114, 128, 135,