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Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States 13 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 9 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 6 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 4 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Joseph D. Wilson or search for Joseph D. Wilson in all documents.

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or the daring of officers and the desperate fighting of the men to have overcome such odds in numbers and strength of position as we encountered all along my whole line, the enemy would have been beaten, but double the force could not have accomplished what my division was ordered to undertake. Among the killed of Quarles' brigade was Col. John R. White, Fifty-third Tennessee. Major Richardson, who succeeded to the command of the regiment, was mortally wounded, and the gallant Lieut.-Col. Joseph D. Wilson was desperately wounded and reported killed by the brigade commander. They fell, said General Quarles, in front of their regiments, leading them on the enemy's works. Truer and more earnest patriots never lived, and the purity of their private characters gracefully softened the ruder virtues of the soldier. Col. W. F. Young, Forty-ninth, was so severely wounded that the amputation of his right arm was necessary. The five officers next in rank to him were shot down, and the sev