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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 35 5 Browse Search
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imparting victory all around, Cols. Poe, Second Michigan volunteers, and Hobart Ward, Thirty-eighth New-York volunteers. Never in any action was the influence of the staff more perceptible. All were most efficient and defiant of danger. I especially notice Capt. Smith, Assistant Adjutant-General of Gen. Berry, and predict for him a career of usefulness and glory. My own staff were truly my means of vision in this battle in the woods. I have to deplore the loss of my. chief of staff, Capt. Wilson, who was killed while putting in execution my desire for a general onset at the period of the last charge, falling within the enemy's lines. Also, of Lieut. Barnard, late of West-Point, at the end of the engagement, after having previously lost a horse. Capt. W. V. Sturgis, my aid, was brave, active, and judicious. Lieut. Moore, another of my aids, renewed on the field his previous distinction gained abroad. My volunteer aid, Mr. Watts Depuyster, bore himself handsomely in this his fi
red yards in front of the brigade under charge of Major Smith, of the Forty-sixth Illinois, acting as officer of the day. Met by skirmishers of the enemy, sharp firing soon ensued, and another company from the Eighth Illinois, under command of Capt. Wilson, was thrown forward to support their comrades already engaged. A spirited combat ensued, in which several of our men were wounded, and among the number Sergeant Barnard Zick, of company B, Eighth Illinois, severely, in the arm. Our further ad, however, is believed to have been considerable. Afterwards and near night, the enemy's skirmishers being increased, retaliated by making an attack upon our skirmishers, confident of success. To his disappointment, however, Captains Lieb and Wilson, of the Eighth Illinois, boldly advanced their companies, and after two rounds of musketry drove him back discomfited. In this second skirmish one of our men was wounded, seven of the enemy killed, and still more wounded, who were carried from t
rs, and the following Home Guards: about sixty men under Capt. J. B. McClintock, and from fifty to sixty men under Captain Lafe Wilson, from Cynthiana and vicinity; Capt. John S. Arthur, of Newport, fifty men; Capt. J. J. Wright, of Cincinnati, fortkilled, nobly and bravely doing his duty as a patriot. Here, too, was killed Jesse Current, young Thomas Rankins, Captain Lafe Wilson, young Hartburn of Cincinnati, and others; besides many, including F. L. St. Thomas, John Scott, Captain McClintocJ. J. Wright of Cincinnati, and others, not now remembered, to any one of whom too much praise cannot be awarded. Captain Lafe Wilson fell near the depot and continued to discharge his revolver as long as life lasted. His last words were: Never suvalry. killed.--Thomas Ware, U. S. Commissioner, Cynthiana Home Guards; Thomas Rankin, Harrison Co. Home Guards; Capt. Lafe Wilson, do.; Jesse Current, do.; Wm. Robinson, do.; Nathan Kennedy, Home Guards; James Atchison, do.; Simpson Eaton, do.;
o return to me on the field, on the evening of the thirtieth ult., after dark, in company with one of my orderlies, (Corporal Wilson, of the First Virginia cavalry,) took a wrong path which led them into the enemy's lines, and they were both capturens Skiles and Hunter, and Lieutenants Hood, Smith, Naughton and Ritter of the Twenty-third Ohio, and Captains Liggett and Wilson of the Twelfth Ohio, were also wounded in the engagement. Lieut. Croome, commanding a section of McMullin's battery, wtzer, and one three-inch rifled gun, under Lieut. Mason; Thirteenth Indiana battery, sixty men; Thirty-third Kentucky, Capt. Wilson--the whole force amounting to two thousand one hundred and twenty-two men for duty. If I were to give a list of thosevolunteered to carry the colors forward in the corn-field, and the following non-commissioned officers and privates: Sergeants Wilson, company A, Coon, company B, Morris, company C; corporals Leonard, company A, Farley, company C; and privates McCann
r. Truly the loss of such an officer in these trying times is a great calamity. I avail myself of this opportunity to return my thanks to the members of my staff--Captains Baird, Flesher, McDonald, and Lieutenants Cravens and Hopper, for their promptness, bravery, and efficiency in the transmission and execution of orders. Captain Baird, unfortunately, in attempting to return to me on the field, on the evening of the thirtieth ult., after dark, in company with one of my orderlies, (Corporal Wilson, of the First Virginia cavalry,) took a wrong path which led them into the enemy's lines, and they were both captured, and are still prisoners. My Brigade-Surgeon, too, Major Daniel Meeker, is always at his post; whether in the field of danger, in the camp, or hospital, his superior science, skill, and patient industry, have proved the greatest blessing to our sick and wounded soldiers. I have sent in lists of my killed, wounded, and missing. R. H. Milroy Brig.-General Commanding Ind
the Twenty-third Ohio, was severely wounded in the arm whilst leading his regiment forward. He refused to leave the field for some time, however, till weakness from loss of blood compelled him. Major E. M. Carey of the Twelfth Ohio, was shot through the thigh late in the action, in which he had greatly distinguished himself by his gallantry and cool courage. Captains Skiles and Hunter, and Lieutenants Hood, Smith, Naughton and Ritter of the Twenty-third Ohio, and Captains Liggett and Wilson of the Twelfth Ohio, were also wounded in the engagement. Lieut. Croome, commanding a section of McMullin's battery, was killed whilst serving a piece in the place of the gunner who had been killed. In the Kanawha division the casualties were five hundred and twenty-eight, of which one hundred and six were killed, three hundred and thirty-six wounded, and eighty-six missing, of all of which a full list will be immediately forwarded. I take pleasure in calling attention to the gallan
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 121.-surrender of Munfordville, Ky. (search)
ole force consisted of the Sixty-seventh and Eighty-ninth Indiana regiments, one company of the Eighteenth regulars, two hundred and four recruits of the Seventeenth Indiana, two companies Seventy-fourth Indiana, one company of cavalry, Louisville Provost Guard, Lieutenant Watson commanding--one twelve-pounder heavy gun, one twelve-pounder Napoleon, one twelve-pounder howitzer, and one three-inch rifled gun, under Lieut. Mason; Thirteenth Indiana battery, sixty men; Thirty-third Kentucky, Capt. Wilson--the whole force amounting to two thousand one hundred and twenty-two men for duty. If I were to give a list of those who did their whole duty, it would simply be a muster-roll of all who were there; no man flinched or held back a particle. I must, however, mention W. A. Bullitt, Adjutant Third Kentucky, who conveyed orders for me through the hottest of the fire with as much coolness as if on review; and Capt. Frank White, Fifteenth Indiana, who superintended the earthworks, and, whenev
the left thigh, immediately after I left him to repeat on the left the order to leave the corn-field. An attempt was made to rally the regiment to the support of a battery at some distance back from the corn-field, but before many had been collected the battery retired, when the efforts became unavailing. I desire to bring to your notice Lieuts. Curtis and Watts, who volunteered to carry the colors forward in the corn-field, and the following non-commissioned officers and privates: Sergeants Wilson, company A, Coon, company B, Morris, company C; corporals Leonard, company A, Farley, company C; and privates McCann, company B, and Peck, company C, who rallied, after the regiment was broken, on the left of the Fifty-first Pennsylvania, and continued fighting until all their ammunition was gone, when I ordered them to recross the river to rejoin the regiment. All the food the men had during the entire day was what very small quantities of salt pork and hard bread they were able to fi
ch fortunately did little damage to his command; and after a few volleys, he led his men to a charge, and cleared the ravine of savages. Major McLaren, with Capt. Wilson's company, took position on the extreme left of the camp, where he kept at bay a party of the enemy who were endeavoring to gain the rear of the camp, and fina— retired with great precipitation. I regret to state that many casualties occurred on our side. The gallant Major Welch was badly wounded in the leg, and Captain Wilson, of the Sixth regiment, was severely bruised by a nearly spent ball in the shoulder. Four of our men were killed, and between thirty and forty wounded, most t for action, and were both under fire for some time. Captains Grant and Bromley shared the dangers of the field with Lieut.-Colonel Marshall's command, while Capt. Wilson with his command rendered efficient service. The other companies of the Sixth regiment were not engaged, having been held in position to defend the rear of th
or ten officers. We had no means of ascertaining the names of all the rebels killed and wounded; but among the number wounded mortally is a son of George D. Prentice, of Louisville. Captain W. Rogers, of Harrison County, was killed, and a Lieutenant Wilson. The rebels left some of their killed and wounded in our hands, all of whom have been properly cared for. They took our horses, buggies, wagons, and all means of transportation to carry off their dead and wounded. Among the killed on t, Mrs. Hooker, S. F. Marshall, V. Weldin, J. T. McKibben, and William Barr. The confederate forces are a battalion of Morgan's. Colonel Bradford, Colonel Harris, and F. L. Cleveland, Esq., are still in the hands of the enemy. On yesterday Colonel Wilson and Colonel Wadsworth, commanding the forces from Maysville and Ripley, pressed on to Brownsville in the effort to overtake the rebels; but were there only in time to fall upon their rear-guard, they having retreated in great haste in the dir