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s were tendered him — particularly by the volunteers — juleps, cock tails, coblers, &c., were proffered him without limit. Jack, like all his race, couldn't resist the temptation, and gave way once or twice to importunities of this character. He expresses himself highly delighted with "rebel" treatment, and intends to pitch his tent among them for all time to come. He is a pleasant fellow, and looked quite military, mounted on one of Clanton's horses. I asked him what sort of fellows Wilson's Zouaves were. He replied, he reckoned they were robbers, gamblers and thieves, as a good many jackets, caps, &c., were missing since their arrival; they were terribly in want of whiskey, a scarce article on the Island. They were about 600 in number, with considerable sickness in the corps. He says the Niagara has 500 men, and carries twelve 11-inch Dahlgren guns. There are not many batteries on the Island, but they are of large guns and rifled cannon. It is awful hot on the Island
Captain William Thompson was at Laurel, in Colonel Jackson's Regiment. Heck says he felt three weeks ago that he was on the wrong side. --Many persons from the rebel army are giving themselves up, and the hills were full of them. They are scattered all over the country. Ex-Lieutenant Governor William L. Jackson, of Parkershurg, in the Rebel army, was killed at Cheat Mountain Pass. A gentleman who arrived yesterday from Beverly states that a young lawyer from Morgantown, named Lowry Wilson, was among the killed of the Rebel forces at Rich Mountain. He had a Colonel's commission from John Letcher, but at the time of his death he was acting as a Captain or Lieutenant. The Secession officers who recently retreated from Laurel Hill and vicinity were exceedingly honest and liberal with the people among whom they . They paid promptly for everything that they couldn't possibly get without pay; and almost invariably in Virginia scrip. Every farmer in the vicinity of any Sece
Captain William Thompson was at Laurel, in Colonel Jackson's Regiment. Heck says he felt three weeks ago that he was on the wrong side. --Many persons from the rebel army are giving themselves up, and the hills were full of them. They are scattered all over the country. Ex-Lieutenant Governor William L. Jackson, of Parkersburg, in the Rebel army, was killed at Cheat Mountain Pass. A gentleman who arrived yesterday from Beverly states that a young lawyer from Morgantown, named Lowry Wilson, was among the killed of the Rebel forces at Rich Mountain. He had a Colonel's commission from John Letcher, but at the time of his death he was acting as a Captain or Lieutenant. The Secession officers who recently retreated from Laurel Hill and vicinity were exceedingly honest and liberal with the people among whom they sojourned. They paid promptly for everything that they couldn't possibly get without pay; and almost invariably in Virginia scrip. Every farmer in the vicinity o
Wholesale plunder. Gen. Wilson's proposition in the United State Senate to confiscate all private property in the South is worthy in its spirit the brute and barbarism by whom it is made, and in its cunning, of a regular Cape Cod Yankee; for it is designed to feel his countrymen with the idea that the South can be made to pay the piper. None but a robber and brigand would suggest such a proceeding, and none but a nation of fools, which the Yankees, when in their sober senses, are not, could be made to believe it practicable.
fight at Rich Mountain and succeeding events. We notices some of its falsehoods. It states that "Ex-Lieut. Gov. Wm. L. Jackson" "was killed at Cheat Mountain Pass."--Col. Jackson is safe with his regiment at Monterey. It states that Col. Lowry Wilson, of Morgantown, was killed at Rich Mountain Col. Wilson is now in this city. A statement made by the Black Republican editor, which our informant considers especially unjust and outrageous, is that Col. Heck had declared after his arrentain Col. Wilson is now in this city. A statement made by the Black Republican editor, which our informant considers especially unjust and outrageous, is that Col. Heck had declared after his arrest that "six weeks ago he felt that he was on the wrong side." Our informant knows Col. II. well, and utterly discredits the statement. He believes him to be true and loyal to Virginia, and is confident that he never could have been induced to make such a confession as that attributed to him.