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July 23. All classes of citizens of Virginia are called upon to contribute their quota of forage for Beauregard's army, and with those who are forgetful of their obligations, the general says that constraint must be employed. --(Doc. 115.) The Missouri State Convention, in session at Jefferson City, passed a resolution this morning, by a vote of 65 to 21, declaring the office of President, held by Gen. Sterling Price at the last session of the Convention, as vacant. Gen. Robert Wilson, the former Vice-President, was unanimously elected President. He is a Union man.--A motion was made to declare the office of doorkeeper vacant, as the present incumbent was elected as a Union man, but has since been editing a secession paper.--Uriel Wright made a violent disunion speech, denouncing the Administration as revolutionary, desperate, and usurping unwarrantable powers, and denouncing the Union leaders at St. Louis and the State. The matter was referred to a committee of three.--
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The ram Manassas at the passage of the New Orleans forts. (search)
d have done, if she omitted any possible chance of putting greater obstructions in the track of the fleet, the fault was mine,--for I was trammeled by no orders from superior authority; I labored under no difficulty of divided counsel; I had not to guard against possible disaffection or be jealous about obedience to my orders. I have finished, having endeavored to avoid personality even to omitting much in praise I could say of brother officers in the same fight, but not in any way connected with the Manassas. Captain Squires, who commanded Fort St. Philip, informed me that his fort had fired seventy-five times at the Manassas, mistaking her for a disabled vessel of the enemy's floating down-stream. The Manassas was not struck once by Fort St. Philip. The following are the only officers living, as far as I know, who were with me on the night referred to: Engineers George W. Weaver and T. A. Menzies, and Pilots Robert Levin and. Robert Wilson. New Orleans, July 30th, 1886.
remained until the morning of the eighteenth, when Captain Robert Wilson arrived with companies A, F, K, and E, of the Twelfhout molestation. Here the infantry was halted, and Captain Wilson took the cavalry and moved out on the Raleigh road foud been attacked in their rear, at Huddleston's Bridge. Captain Wilson gave Lieutenant Glotfeldter command of the three remaihe rebel cavalry appeared in force. The cavalry under Captain Wilson fell back for the purpose of reenforcing company K, ofched the outside picket-fort. While running the road, Captain Wilson had his horse shot from under him, but escaped unhurt,without doing any damage. When the detachment under Captain Wilson reached camp, the works were call filled with troops, wen McGinnis, a sergeant of company A, of the Twelfth, Captain Wilson. He was struck on the head with a ball from a twelve ing by the rest of the boys. During the operations of Captain Wilson and his command, three men were wounded and six missin
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cornwallis, Lord Charles 1738-1805 (search)
nder of their arms, and then received from O'Hara the sword of Cornwallis, which was politely returned to him to be restored to the earl. The surrender of the colors of the vanquished army, twenty-eight in number, now took place. Twenty-eight British captains, each bearing a flag in a case, were drawn up in line. Opposite to them, at a distance of six paces, twenty-eight American sergeants were placed in line to receive the colors. The interesting ceremony was conducted by an ensign (Robert Wilson), then only eighteen years of age. The troops then laid down their arms. The whole number surrendered was about 7,000. To these must be added 2,000 sailors, 1,800 negroes, and 1,500 Tories, making the total number of prisoners 12,300. The British lost, in killed, wounded, and One of the articles of capitulation, with Cornwallis's signature. missing, during the siege 550 men. The Americans lost about 300. The spoils were nearly 8,000 muskets, seventy-five brass and 160 iron cannon
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cotton, John 1585-1652 (search)
Cotton, John 1585-1652 Clergyman; born in Derby, England, Dec. 4, 1585; became minister of St. Botolph's Church, Boston, Lincolnshire, about 1612, and remained there, a noted preacher and controversialist, for twenty years, constantly leaning towards Puritanism. For his non-conformity he was cited to appear before Archbishop Laud, when he fled to America, arriving in Boston in September, 1633. He was soon afterwards ordained a colleague with Mr. Wilson in the Boston Church. His ministry there for nineteen years was so influential that he has been called The patriarch of New England. He was a firm opponent of Roger Williams, and defended the authority of ministers and magistrates. He and Davenport were invited to assist in the assembly of divines at Westminster, but were dissuaded from going by Hooker. He died in Boston, Dec. 23, 1652. God's promise to his plantations.— The following sermon, to which a large historical importance has been given, was preached in England, a
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Missouri, (search)
Jan. 31, 1885 Albert G. MorehouseactingDec. 28, 1887 David R. Francis (Dem.)term beginsJan., 1889 William J. Stone (Dem.)term beginsJan., 1893 Lou V. Stephensterm beginsJan., 1897 A. M. Dockeryterm beginsJan., 1901 United States Senators. Name.No. of Congress.Term. David Barton17th to 21st1821 to 1831 Thomas H. Benton17th to 31st1821 to 1851 Alexander Buckner22d1831 to 1833 Lewis F. Linn23d to 27th1833 to 1843 David R. Atchison28th to 33d1843 to 1856 Henry S. Geyer32d to 34th1851 to 1857 James Stephen Green34th to 36th1857 to 1861 Trusten Polk35th to 37th1857 to 1862 Waldo P. Johnson37th1861 to 1862 John B. Henderson37th to 40th1862 to 1869 Robert Wilson37th1862 B. Gratz Brown38th to 39th1863 to 1867 Charles D. Drake40th to 41st1867 to 1870 Francis P. Blair, Jr41st to 42d1871 to 1873 Carl Schurz41st to 42d1869 to 1875 Lewis F. Bogy43d to 45th1873 to 1877 Francis M. Cockrell44th to—1875 to — David H. Armstrong45th1877 to 1879 George G. Vest46th to—187
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Missouri, (search)
of the lives, liberty, and property of citizens of the State ......June 12, 1861 Governor Jackson, with the State troops, proceeds to Booneville, leaving the capital to fall into the hands of Lyon......June 15, 1861 General Lyon defeats the State troops under Colonel Marmaduke in battle at Booneville......June 17, 1861 An indecisive battle is fought at Carthage between State troops under General Jackson and Federals under General Sigel......July 5, 1861 State convention makes Robert Wilson president in place of Sterling Price, made major-general in the Confederate army......July 22, 1861 State convention declares the office of governor, of lieutenant-governor, and of members of legislature vacant, and elects Hamilton R. Gamble as provisional governor......July 31, 1861 Thomas C. Reynolds, ex-lieutenant-governor, proclaims from New Madrid that the forces of General Pillow had come on the invitation of Governor Jackson, to aid in expelling the enemy ......July 31, 1861
Palfrey's Bartlett, p. 83. or when the commander of a picket station bade his men present arms to General Meade across the river at Richmond, instead of firing upon him, when they had him absolutely in their power; or when, on the other side, General Kershaw was spared by the Union officers at Fredericksburg when he alone dared ride up to reconnoitre the enemy from a knoll which was swept by the fire of the sharpshooters of both armies. Both these last incidents are related by the Rev. Robert Wilson in the Charleston (S. C.) News and Courier, quoted in the Boston Transcript (July 14, 1896). The Richmond incident was told him by Colonel McCoy of Pennsylvania, a member of General Meade's staff, and present on the occasion described. The gradual development of the Union cavalry, which at first was distinctly inferior to the Confederate and in the end overwhelmingly superior, In Crowninshield's 1st Mass. Cavalry there is an admirable essay on the development of the Union cava
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died., List of Massachusetts officers, and soldiers who died as prisoners. (search)
. C.,Oct. 6, 1864. Wilson, George, Enlisted from Lowell.3d Mass. Cav.,Richmond, Va.,March 19, 1864. Wilson, George, Enlisted from Boston.3d Mass. Cav.,Richmond, Va.,March 19, 1864. Wilson, Hynes,57th Mass. Inf.,Danville, Va.,Dec. 17, 1864. Wilson, J.,*22d Mass. Inf.,Richmond, Va.,Jan. 8, 1864. Wilson, James,17th Mass. Inf.,Savannah, Ga.,Nov. 3, 1864. Wilson, James,2d Mass. H. A.,Andersonville, Ga.,Sept. 1, 1864. Wilson, Owen A.,2d Mass. H. A.,Charleston, S. C.,Oct. 6, 1864. Wilson, Robert,34th Mass. Inf.,Andersonville, Ga.,Aug. 25, 1864. Wilson, Samuel R.,54th Mass. Inf.,Florence, S. C.,Jan. 17, 1865. Wilson, Solon A.,2d Mass. H. A.,Andersonville, Ga.,Aug. 25, 1864. Wilson, William, Also reported mustered out, June 30, 1865.19th Mass. Inf.,Andersonville, Ga.,Oct. 8, 1864. Wilton, E.,20th Mass. Inf.,Salisbury, N. C.,--- Winchester, Silas, Corp.,23d Mass. Inf.,Florence, S. C.,Oct. 19, 1864. Wingate, George B., Bugler,1st Mass. Cav.,On Flag of Truce Boat, New York.N
. C.,Oct. 6, 1864. Wilson, George, Enlisted from Lowell.3d Mass. Cav.,Richmond, Va.,March 19, 1864. Wilson, George, Enlisted from Boston.3d Mass. Cav.,Richmond, Va.,March 19, 1864. Wilson, Hynes,57th Mass. Inf.,Danville, Va.,Dec. 17, 1864. Wilson, J.,*22d Mass. Inf.,Richmond, Va.,Jan. 8, 1864. Wilson, James,17th Mass. Inf.,Savannah, Ga.,Nov. 3, 1864. Wilson, James,2d Mass. H. A.,Andersonville, Ga.,Sept. 1, 1864. Wilson, Owen A.,2d Mass. H. A.,Charleston, S. C.,Oct. 6, 1864. Wilson, Robert,34th Mass. Inf.,Andersonville, Ga.,Aug. 25, 1864. Wilson, Samuel R.,54th Mass. Inf.,Florence, S. C.,Jan. 17, 1865. Wilson, Solon A.,2d Mass. H. A.,Andersonville, Ga.,Aug. 25, 1864. Wilson, William, Also reported mustered out, June 30, 1865.19th Mass. Inf.,Andersonville, Ga.,Oct. 8, 1864. Wilton, E.,20th Mass. Inf.,Salisbury, N. C.,--- Winchester, Silas, Corp.,23d Mass. Inf.,Florence, S. C.,Oct. 19, 1864. Wingate, George B., Bugler,1st Mass. Cav.,On Flag of Truce Boat, New York.N
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