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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 9: Poetry and Eloquence. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
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h in the rolling din: He knows the sweeping charge is made, The cheering lines are closing in. Unmindful of his mortal wound, He faintly calls and seeks to rise; But weakness drags him to the ground:— Such is the death the soldier dies. Robert Burns Wilson. The volunteer ‘At dawn,’ he said, ‘I bid them all farewell, To go where bugles call and rifles gleam.’ And with the restless thought asleep he fell, And glided into dream. A great hot plain from sea to mountain spread,— Through it a de, left on the last Spotsylvania battlefield. In the actions about Spotsylvania Court House, of which this engagement was the close, the Union army lost about fifteen thousand. With sympathy for the last moments of each soldier, such as Robert Burns Wilson has put into his poem opposite, the horror of war becomes all too vivid. Ewell's attack illustrates the sudden facing of death that may come to every soldier. The desperate fighting about Spotsylvania had been prolonged ten days and
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 4: the New South: Lanier (search)
ess of his adopted section. The lines well up from a sympathy that interprets and enshrines. They flow with a haunting melody worthy of the magician in metre whom they celebrate. Less sectional, more completely national in spirit, was Robert Burns Wilson (1850-1916). He was endowed with a double gift—the gifts of painting and poetry, each of them genuine. It must be conceded that he did not have to break the shackles of sectionalism. Born in Pennsylvania and moving early to Virginia, he ina—1876 had given way to the new conception of a united country and eager, confident prospects for the future. The most salient figure in this change, in fact the most distinguished man of letters of the New South, is Sidney Lanier, who, like Wilson, was endowed with a double gift—music and poetry. He was born in Macon, Georgia, 3 February, 1846. His father was a lawyer of undistinguished abilities but of cultured and literary tastes. His mother was devotedly religious, and reared her fam<
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
, wide world, the, 398 Widow Bedott. See Whitcher, Frances Miriam Widow Bedott papers, the, 154 Widow Sprigg, Mary Elmer, and other sketches, 154 Wilberforce, William, 45 Wilde, Richard Henry, 167, 289 Wilkins, Mary E. See Freeman, Mary E. Wilkins William the Silent, 141 Williams College, 219, 223 Willis, Nathaniel, 399 Willis, N. P., 61, 63 n., 164, 167, 168, 173, 174, 187, 399 Williamson, Dr., Hugh, 106 William Wilson, 68 Willson, Forceythe, 281 Wilson, Robert Burns, 331, 346 Wilson, Woodrow, 289 Winsor, Justin, 128 Winter, William, 286 Winthrop, John, 110 Winthrop, Theodore, 280 Wirt, William, 104, 105 Wise, Henry Augustus, 154 Wister, Owen, 293, 363 With My friends, 388 Without and within, 242 Wives of the dead, the, 23 Wolfe, Gen., 11 Wonder books, 21, 401 Wonderful One-Hoss Shay, The, 237 Wondersmith, the, 373, 374 Wood, Mrs., John, 291 Woodhouse, Lord, 141 Woodrow, James, 333, 341 Woods, Leonard, 208