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William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik 18 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik. You can also browse the collection for Robert L. Wilson or search for Robert L. Wilson in all documents.

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ndition in a long letter. Dr. Drake responded, saying substantially, I cannot prescribe in your case without a personal interview. Joshua F. Speed, to whom Lincoln showed the letter addressed to Dr. Drake, writing to me from Louisville, November 30, 1866, says: I think he (Lincoln) must have informed Dr. Drake of his early love for Miss Rutledge, as there was a part of the letter which he would not read. It is shown by the declaration of Mr. Lincoln himself made to a fellow member Robert L. Wilson, Ms., letter, Feb. 10, 1866. of the Legislature within two years after Anne Rutledge's death that although he seemed to others to enjoy life rapturously, yet when alone he was so overcome by mental depression he never dared to carry a pocket knife. It may not be amiss to suggest before I pass from mention of McNamar that, true to his promise, he drove into New Salem in the fall of 1835 with his mother and brothers and sisters. They had come through from New York in a wagon, with all t
his challenger, foreboded a tumultuous scene. The excitement that followed, relates another one of the candidates, R. L. Wilson, letter, Feb. 10, 1866, Ms. was intense — so much so that fighting men thought a duel must settle the difficulty. Mr. The nine elected were, Abraham Lincoln, Ninian W. Edwards, John Dawson, Andrew McCormick, Dan Stone, Wm. F. Elkin, Robert L. Wilson, Job Fletcher, and Archer G. Herndon. The last two were senators. On assembling at Vandalia they were at once, on . In height they averaged over six feet, and in weight over two hundred pounds. We were not only noted, says one R. L. Wilson, Ms. of them, for our number and length, but for our combined influence. All the bad or objectional laws passed at thhem every inch of the way. The struggle was warm and protracted. Its enemies, relates one of Lincoln's colleagues, R. L. Wilson, Ms. laid it on the table twice. In those darkest hours when our bill to all appearances was beyond resuscitation, an
m taking up Douglas, a veritable dodger,--once a tool of the South, now its enemy,--and pushing him to the front. He forgets that when he does that he pulls me down at the same time. I fear Greeley's attitude will damage me with Sumner, Seward, Wilson, Phillips, and other friends in the East. This was said with so much of mingled sadness and earnestness that I was deeply impressed. Lincoln was gloomy and restless the entire day. Greeley's letters were driving the enthusiasm out of him. Gr he can keep the attention of our Illinois people from being diverted from the great and vital question of the day to the minor and temporary issues which are now being discussed. Letter, December 27, 1857, Ms. In Washington I saw also Seward, Wilson, and others of equal prominence. Douglas was confined to his house by illness, but on receiving my card he directed me to be shown up to his room. We had a pleasant and interesting interview. Of course the conversation soon turned on Lincoln.
Chapter 19. Lincoln face to face with the realities of civil war. master of the situation. the distrust of old politicians. how the President viewed the battle of Bull run. an interesting reminiscence by Robert L. Wilson. Lincoln's plan to suppress the Rebellion. dealing with McClellan and Grant. efforts to hasten the Emancipation Proclamation Lincoln withstands the pressure. calling the Cabinet together and reading the decree. the letter to the Unconditional-Union men. thhe was not the man they bargained for. Next in importance to the attack on Fort Sumter, from a military standpoint, was the battle of Bull Run. How the President viewed it is best illustrated by an incident furnished by an old friend Robert L. Wilson, Ms., Feb. 10, 1866. who was an associate of his in the Legislature of Illinois, and who was in Washington when the engagement took place. The night after the battle, he relates, accompanied by two Wisconsin Congressmen, I called at the Whi