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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for T. R. Wilson or search for T. R. Wilson in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.56 (search)
es A. Bayard, father of the present Ambassador, with a number of others, attempted to amend the resolution that it should provide merely that the names of the members be stricken from the list of senators, and the vote for the expulsion of the recalcitrants showed ten negatives, the most prominent among them being Bayard, John C. Breckinridge, Jesse D. Bright and Andrew Johnson. Among those voting for the resolution were Zach Chandler, Seward, Sumner, Hale, Wade, Cameron, Harlan, Trumbull, Wilson, Fessenden, Anthony and Douglas. Among those from the South who had left the Senate previous to Clingman's disappearanec, were Jefferson Davis, James M. Mason, Judah P. Benjamin, Robert Toombs, Slidell, and others hardly less notable. It is by all odds the most historical Senate in its membership that has ever assembled, or there is hardly one whose name is not written indelibly in history. Of all the notable Southerners, Clingman is the only one remaining above the sod, and Harlan is the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.57 (search)
Battalion, three companies, Captain W. H. D. Carrington; Giddings' Battalion, six companies, Captain William Robinson; Jones' Light Battery, Captain O. G. Jones; Wilson's Cavalry, one company (unattached), Captain T. R. Wilson; Cocke's Cavalry, one company (unattached), Captain J. B. (?) Cocke. If these companies were full, thCaptain T. R. Wilson; Cocke's Cavalry, one company (unattached), Captain J. B. (?) Cocke. If these companies were full, there would be about 1,500 men, but Captain Carrington, in his report of the battle, says that on May 1, 1865, there were about 500 Confederate troops of all arms on the Rio Grande, and Colonel Ford says this is substantially correct, and that Captain Carrington is also correct when he says that there were only about 300 Confederate also moving forward, perhaps to sustain skirmishers. Ford immediately made his dispositions. His right wing was under command of Captain Robinson. Cocke's and Wilson's Companies were ordered to attack the enemy's right flank; the artillery was directed to open fire at once, which was done with effect. Colonel Ford supported t