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Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union, Company A. (search)
18, 1864. Edmund G. Welsh, New Bedford, 21, m; farmer. Jan. 25, 1864. Killed in action Oct. 19, 1864, Cedar Creek, Va. John B. Welford, Salem, 40, m; mariner. Oct. 27, 1863. Trans. 2nd Co. 2nd Batt, V. R.C. and disch. July 31, 1865. Prior serv. Horatio C. Wheaton, New Bedford, 27, s; mason. Aug. 22, 1862. Disch. June 1, 1863. Charles D. Whittemore, New Bedford, 19, s; clerk. Jan. 12, 1864. M. O. Sept. 28, 1865. George Wilcox, New Bedford, 19, s; clerk. Aug. 19, 1862. Disch. July 13, 1863, to accept commission. Frederick T. Wilcox, New Bedford, 22; carpenter. Aug. 21, 1862. Disch. disa. Oct. 14, 1863. James Williams, Jr., E. Boston, 21, m; teamster. March 14, 1864. M. O. Sept. 28, 1865. William H. Wilson, New Bedford, 20, s; confectioner. Oct. 8, 1864. M. O. Sept. 28, 1865. Zeno K. wood, New Bedford, 21, s; clerk. Aug. 21, 1862. Disch. April 27, 1864. Francis A. Young, New Bedford, 28, m, teamster. Aug. 31, 1862. Disch. May 20, 1865.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Colonel James Gregory Hodges. (search)
re remembered as among the most honorable citizens of Portsmouth: Gen. John Hodges, president; Holt Wilson, Dr. Joseph Schoolfield, Capt. James Thompson, Col. M. Cooke, John A. Chandler, Dr. R. R. Butt, Dr. A. R. Smith, Dr. William Collins, William H. Wilson, Maj. Gwynn. This school had a large number of cadets. Of these cadets James Gregory Hodges, of the senior department, and John Collins Woodley, the brother of the late Dr. Joseph R. Woodley, of the junior department, were by common conseodges to the Fourteenth Virginia regiment and to the command of Jamestown Island took him from his homeā€”from the companionship of his wife and two infant boys. On the 11th day of August, 1853, he married Sarah A. F. Wilson, the daughter of William H. Wilson and Ellen Keeling. His son, William Wilson Hodges, was born on the 29th of April, 1854, and his son, John Nelson Hodges, was born on the 3rd of May, when he was in command at the Naval Hospital grounds, and he gave to his little baby son t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), An incident of the battle of Winchester, or Opequon. (search)
r sturdy valor has no superior in the whole war. Ramseur, on our right, held his own against Sheridan's assault most gallantly. Rodes came in and drove the enemy's front, a splendid achievement. The battle trembled in the balance, as Colonel Thomas H. Carter says, and the artillery, of which he was the chief, rolled back in disaster and dismay the assaults made upon it. The turn of the battle came about the time the Eighth Corps and Torbet's whole corps of cavalry, with the exception of Wilson's division (which had been thrown to our right and held in check by Lomax), advanced, overlapping the small commands of Fitz Lee and Breckenridge a mile in distance and seeming to cover the whole face of the earth with their massive numbers. Just at that juncture Rodes fell, while directing his division with great skill and energy, and but for this deplorable misfortune it is far from certain that the Confederates would not have prevailed. But the two things came at once, the enemy's reinf
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
inia, Regiment, 3rd, organization of, 185; 14th, organization of, 193. Walker, Gen. R. Lindsay, 125. Warren, General, relieved of command, 174. White, Lt. Col. J. L., 16, Whitehead, Col. A. W., 164,165. Willis, Gen. Edward, 236. Wilson, Henry. 245. Wilson. Gen. James, 18. Wirz, Capt, Henry, 341. Wisdom's Famous Ride, 372. Withers, Col. R. E., 321. Wise, L. W., 361. Winchester, Incidents of battle of, 232. Wood, H. E., 52. Woollen Mills, Crenshaw, 7. Wrig 193. Walker, Gen. R. Lindsay, 125. Warren, General, relieved of command, 174. White, Lt. Col. J. L., 16, Whitehead, Col. A. W., 164,165. Willis, Gen. Edward, 236. Wilson, Henry. 245. Wilson. Gen. James, 18. Wirz, Capt, Henry, 341. Wisdom's Famous Ride, 372. Withers, Col. R. E., 321. Wise, L. W., 361. Winchester, Incidents of battle of, 232. Wood, H. E., 52. Woollen Mills, Crenshaw, 7. Wright, Gen. A. R, 164; Address of, 165. Wright, Major M. H., 16.
An Escaped prisoner. We had an interview on Saturday with Mr. Wm. H. Wilson, of the 28th Virginia regiment, who recently made his escape from Castle Williams, on Governor's Island, New York. He was captured by the Yankees at the battle of Williamsburg, and immediately paroled for three weeks to wait upon the Confederate wounded. At the expiration of this time he was sent under guard to Fortress Monroe, and transferred thence to Governor's Island. Among his observations while there was the fact that the prisoners taken by Gen. Van Dorn at an early period of the war, and subsequently released, are performing guard duty at Castle Williams, thus virtually violating the conditions of their parole Mr. W. effected his escape on the 22d of June, in a manner which it is not necessary to state. After remaining for a short time in New York, he proceeded to Philadelphia, where, by adroit representations, he borrowed a sum of money from a Union man, and in due time reached Baltimore. In
, should the rebels prove twice as strong as they are represented to be. Burnside, we regret to say, has not reinforced Rosecrans, as was expected. Miscellaneous. The Washington Chronicle, of the 21st, says: From private information of a strictly reliable nature we learn that the rams (rebel) now building in England will not be permitted by that Government to go at large, but will be escorted to France by an English war steamer, and delivered to the owners, who are Frenchmen. It is reported that the rebel Generals Marsh Walker, was mortally wounded on Sunday, the 6th inst., in a duel with the rebel Gen. Marmaduke, at Bayou Metairie. The difficulty was occasioned by Mermaduke's jealousy of Walker, who had recently been promoted from the subordinate to the ranking General. The American states that William H. Wilson and Lieut. A. O. Brummell, "refugees from the South," have arrived in Baltimore. The latest quotation of gold in New York was 139 1-2.
osses in the engagements of July 1st, 2d, and 3d--killed, 2834; wounded, 13,709; missing. 6,643; total, 23, 186. Three guns, 41 standards, and 13,621 prisoners fell into our hands." Judge Lowrie, of Philadelphia, has given a decision against the constitutionality of the draft. It won't do any good, however, as there is not any habeas corpus now. Bogus Union meetings are being held in Little Rock, Ask. The Evening Transcript, a paper started in Baltimore two weeks ago, by Wm. H. Wilson, one of the former proprietors of the Gazette, has been suppressed by Gen. Schenck. The fight at Rappahannock Station seems to have been considered by the Yankees as a regular battle. Meade has issued a congratulatory order upon the event. Ferdinand Richardson, for many years Clerk of the late U. S. District Court in Eastern Virginia, has been confined in the Old Capitol at Washington as a hostage. Little Rock advices, of the 6th inst., say that the rebel Gens. Price's an
Stolen jewelry. --The evidence against the unfortunate girl that robbed Mrs. Wilson of her jewelry, on Tuesday last, showed that a small portion of it was recovered from a Miss Pike, a little girl about ten years of age, to whom it was given as a keepsake by the child that took it. The receiver was too young to know the impropriety of accepting such a gift; but when questioned about it readily returned it.
From Norfolk and the vicinity. --From Norfolk it is stated that Butler is rigidly enforcing his order requiring all persons to take the oath of allegiance to the Lincoln Government. Large numbers have taken this oath in Norfolk, and every male citizen of Portsmouth, except three. These are Dr. Arthur R. Smith, Wm. H. Wilson, and Fisher Matthews. These gentlemen, we hear, positively refuse, and say they will suffer any consequence. In Nansemond and Princess Anne counties all citizens residing between Bernard's Mill and Portsmouth have taken the oath. Many of these, if not all, are loyal to the Confederate Government, but they have no alternative save banishment from their homes. Bernard's Mill is the outer picket station of the Federals. Six citizens of Nansemond county have been sentenced by Butler to six months imprisonment for whipping a negro. We could learn the names of but three, viz: Wright King, Cornelius Bidgood, and John B. Wright. The reported fight ne
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