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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 24 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 13 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, A book of American explorers 7 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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o strike with irresistible force at the weak points in the defense. Thus it was, according to Robert E. Lee, that he was enabled to give the Confederacy a mortal wound before any of its armies surrendered. One feature of Sherman's campaigns, after leaving Atlanta, has been severely criticised. Much of the destruction of private property in Georgia and South Carolina, it is held, was not only unnecessary but amounted to cruelty in depriving the population of the necessities of life. Woodrow Wilson says of the work of the armies under Sherman's command: They had devoted themselves to destruction and the stripping of the land they crossed with a thoroughness and a care for details hardly to be matched in the annals of modern warfare— each soldier played the marauder very heartily. Sherman himself intimated that the march would make Georgia howl, and would make its inhabitants feel that war and ruin are synonymous terms. The most intense feeling on the subject still exists in the c
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Alabama. (search)
On March 13, a State convention ratified the constitution adopted by the Confederate Congress. The authorities of the State seized the national property within its borders, and sent troops to Florida to assist in capturing Fort Pickens and other public works there. Alabama sent a commissioner to Washington as an ambassador, but he was not received. During the war that ensued. Alabama bore her share of the burden, and her cities and plantations suffered from the ravages of the conflict. Wilson's cavalry raid through the State caused great destruction of property. During the war Alabama furnished 122,000 troops to the Confederate army, of whom 35,000 were killed or wounded. Montgomery, in the interior of the State, was the Confederate capital until July, 1861, when the seat of government was removed to Richmond. At the close of the war a provisional governor for Alabama was appointed (June 21. 1865), and in September a convention re-ordained the civil and criminal laws, exceptin
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), entry 1598 (search)
Democracy in the United States, character of. by courtesy of Messrs. Charles Scribner's Sons. Prof. Woodrow Wilson of Princeton University (Professor of Jurisprudence and Politics), the wellknown author, critic, and lecturer, writes as follows: Everything apprises us of the fact that we are not the same nation now that we were when the government was formed. In looking back to that time, the impression is inevitable that we started with sundry wrong ideas about ourselves. We deemed ourselves rank democrats, whereas we were in fact only progressive Englishmen. Turn the leaves of that sage manual of constitutional interpretation and advocacy, the Federalist, and note the perverse tendency of its writers to refer to Greece and Rome for precedents—that Greece and Rome which haunted all our earlier and even some of our more mature years. Recall, too, that familiar story of Daniel Webster which tells of his coming home exhausted from an interview with the first President-e
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Wilson, Woodrow 1856- (search)
Wilson, Woodrow 1856- Educator; born in Staunton, Va., Dec. 28, 1856; graduated at Princeton College in 1879; studied law at the University of Virginia, and took a special course at Johns Hopkins in 1883-85; was Professor of History and Political Economy at Bryn Mawr College in 1885-88, and at Wesleyan University in 1888-90. In the latter year he accepted the chair of Jurisprudence and Politics at Princeton College. His publications include Congressional government, a study in American politics; The State: elements of Historical and practical politics; Division and reunion, 1829-89; George Washington; A short history of the people of the United States; Colonies and nation, etc.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Winchester, battles of (search)
rill repulsed), Sheridan put his forces under arms, and, at 3 A. M. on Sept. 19, they were in motion towards Winchester, Wilson's cavalry leading, followed by Wright's and Emory's corps. Wilson crossed the Opequan at dawn, charging upon and sweepWilson crossed the Opequan at dawn, charging upon and sweeping away all opposers, and securing a place, within two miles of Winchester, for the deployment of the army. There they formed, with Wright's corps on the left, flanked by Wilson's cavalry, Emory in the centre, and Crook's Kanawha infantry in reservWilson's cavalry, Emory in the centre, and Crook's Kanawha infantry in reserve in the rear. Early had turned back towards Winchester before Sheridan was ready for battle, and strongly posted his men in a fortified position on a series of detached hills. Averill had followed them closely from Bunker's Hill, and he and Merritavily upon Early's left. At the same time there was a general charge upon the Confederate centre by the infantry, and by Wilson's cavalry on Early's right, driving the Confederates to the fortified heights. Before 5 P. M. the latter were carried, a
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
Bedott. See Whitcher, Frances Miriam Widow Bedott papers, the, 154 Widow Sprigg, Mary Elmer, and other sketches, 154 Wilberforce, William, 45 Wilde, Richard Henry, 167, 289 Wilkins, Mary E. See Freeman, Mary E. Wilkins William the Silent, 141 Williams College, 219, 223 Willis, Nathaniel, 399 Willis, N. P., 61, 63 n., 164, 167, 168, 173, 174, 187, 399 Williamson, Dr., Hugh, 106 William Wilson, 68 Willson, Forceythe, 281 Wilson, Robert Burns, 331, 346 Wilson, Woodrow, 289 Winsor, Justin, 128 Winter, William, 286 Winthrop, John, 110 Winthrop, Theodore, 280 Wirt, William, 104, 105 Wise, Henry Augustus, 154 Wister, Owen, 293, 363 With My friends, 388 Without and within, 242 Wives of the dead, the, 23 Wolfe, Gen., 11 Wonder books, 21, 401 Wonderful One-Hoss Shay, The, 237 Wondersmith, the, 373, 374 Wood, Mrs., John, 291 Woodhouse, Lord, 141 Woodrow, James, 333, 341 Woods, Leonard, 208 Woolsey, Sarah, 402 Woolson
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
at giants. The volume containing Pudd'nhead Wilson and Those extraordinary Twins, published in 18ragedy which it had set in motion. Pudd'nhead Wilson, disfigured by vestiges of the farce in the inrth, Mary Jane Holmes, and Augusta Jane Evans (Wilson), all more or less in the Charlotte Temple tra the memorable phrase of a later essayist, Woodrow Wilson, President of the United States. One recaland to name Howells, Woodberry, Santayana, Woodrow Wilson, Henry Van Dyke, Brander Matthews, Paul ElJoshua Whitcomb, Davy Crockett, and Pudd'nhead Wilson. Perhaps one of the most typically American pernment and its purposes. This began with Woodrow Wilson's Congressional government (1885), which pfar as nature and the needs of men reach. Woodrow Wilson in his The State advocated state regulation Theodore Roosevelt's New nationalism and Woodrow Wilson's New freedom. Less popular but more profBarrett Wendell; The spirit of learning by Woodrow Wilson. These with many others of similar excell
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
f Pacific Coast history, 146 Publications of the historical Society of California, 143 Public debts, 442 Public economy for the United States, 435 Public libraries in the United States, 171 n. Puchner, R., 582 Puck, 22 Pudd'nhead Wilson, 18, 19 Pulitzer, Joseph, 329, 330 Pumpelly, Raphael, 164 Punch, 22, 100, 309 Pupil, the, 104 Putnam, G. H., 543, 543 n. Putnam, G. P., 547 Putnam's magazine, 314 Putnam's monthly and the critic 314 Putnam's monthly magazine, 315 Williams College, 413, 435, 467 Williamson, Hugh, 179 Willie and Mary, 511 Willis, N. P., 35, 40, 109-10, 549 Willkomm, 579 Willoughby, W. W., 361 Willow tree, the, 292 Will Widder Buwele Sei, 585 Wilson, Francis, 280 Wilson, Woodrow, 114, 129, 306, 361, 365, 417 Winchevsky, Morris, 603 Winds of Doctrine, 258 n., 260 n., 261 n. Wings of the Dove, the, 98, 101 Winsor, Justin, 186-87 Winter, William, 36, 40, 46, 47, 128, 272-73 Winthrop, R. C., 337 Winthrop, Th
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, A book of American explorers, Epochs of American History. (search)
little to say except in praise. —English Historical Review. III. Division and re-union, 1829-1889. By Woodrow Wilson, Ph.D., Ll.D., Professor of Jurisprudence in Princeton College; Author of Congressional Government, The State—Elements of Hi from bias, and as much pains to be just, as if the author were delineating Pericles, or Alcibiades, Sulla, or Caesar. Dr. Wilson has earned the gratitude of seekers after truth by his masterly production.—N. C. University Magazine. This admirabters can more vividly set forth the views of parties. —Atlantic Monthly. Students of United States history may thank Mr. Wilson for an extremely clear and careful rendering of a period very difficult to handle . . . they will find themselves materially aided in easy comprehension of the political situation of the country by the excellent maps.—N. Y Times. Professor Wilson writes in a clear and forcible style. . . . The bibliographical references at the head of each chapter are both wel
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The dismemberment of Virginia. (search)
by the votes of States at Philadelphia, and accepted by the votes of States in popular conventions, it is safe to say that there was not a man in the country, from Washington and Hamilton, on the one side, to George Clinton and George Mason, on the other, who regarded the new system as anything but an experiment entered upon by the States, and from which each and every State had the right peaceably to withdraw, a right which was very likely to be exercised. Speaking to the same effect, Woodrow Wilson declares that the men of that time would certainly have laughed at any such idea as that of a national government constituting an indestructible bond of union for the States. ExPresi-dent Adams, in an address delivered in 1839, said that should alienation of feeling take place, it would be far better for the people of the dis-United States to part in friendship from each other than to be held together by constraint. Then, said he, will be the time for reverting to the precedents which
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