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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 146 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 41 5 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 40 2 Browse Search
John Beatty, The Citizen-Soldier; or, Memoirs of a Volunteer 37 13 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 27 9 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 26 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 24 0 Browse Search
A. J. Bennett, private , First Massachusetts Light Battery, The story of the First Massachusetts Light Battery , attached to the Sixth Army Corps : glance at events in the armies of the Potomac and Shenandoah, from the summer of 1861 to the autumn of 1864. 23 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 7, 1862., [Electronic resource] 16 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 16 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I.. You can also browse the collection for Wilson or search for Wilson in all documents.

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* He contended that the importation of slaves would be for the interest of the whole Union. The more slaves, the more products to employ the carrying trade; the more consumption also; and the more of this, the more revenue for the common treasury. He admitted it to be reasonable, that slaves should be dutied, like other imports, but should consider a rejection of the clause as an exclusion of South Carolina from the Union. Mr. Baldwin has similar conceptions in the case of Georgia. Mr. Wilson (of Pennsylvania) observed, that, if South Carolina and Georgia were thus disposed to get rid of the importation of slaves in a short time, as had been suggested, they would never refuse to unite, because the importation might be prohibited. As the section now stands, all articles imported are to be taxed. Slaves alone are exempt. This is, in fact, a bounty on that article. Mr. Dickinson [of Delaware] expressed his sentiments as of a similar character. And Messrs. King and Langdon [
argement of Federal power by latitudinous and unwarranted construction. In the Federal Convention of 1787 (Debate of Monday, June 18th): Mr. Hamilton, of New York, said: The General power, whatever be its form, if it preserves itself, must swallow up the State Governments. Otherwise, it would be swallowed up by them. It is against all the principles of good government to vest the requisite powers in such a body as Congress. Two sovereignties cannot exist within the same limits. Mr. Wilson. of Pennsylvania (June 20th), was tenacious of the idea of preserving the State Governments. But in the next day's debate: Taking the matter in the more general view, lie saw no danger to the States from the General Government. On the contrary, he conceived that, in spite of every precaution, the General (Government would be in perpetual danger of encroachments from the State Governments. And Mr. Madison, of Virginia, was of the opinion, in the first place, that there was less danger
Hamlin, Harlan, King, Simmons, Sumner, Ten Eyck, Wade, and Wilson--19. 2. Resolved, That negro Slavery, as it exists inin, of Maine, Clark and Hale, of New Hampshire, Sumner and Wilson, of Massachulsetts, Simmons, of Rhode Island, Dixon and FoPolk, Pugh, Simmons, Ten Eyck, Toombs, Trumbull, Wade, and Wilson--26. Nays--Messrs. Benjamin, Bright, Brown, Chesnut, Closter, Hale, Hamlin, Latham, Pugh, Ten Eyck, Trumbull, and Wilson, voting in the affirmative. The original resolution wasFoster, Hale, Pugh, Simmons, Ten Eyck, Trumbull, Wade, and Wilson. 0 7. Resolved, That the provision of the Constitution e Nays were Messrs. Chandler, Clark, Foot, Hale, Wade, and Wilson. The Senate then proceeded, on motion of Mr. Wilson, ofMr. Wilson, of Massachusetts, to reconsider Mr. Clingman's resolution hitherto given--Mr. Wilson stating that, for himself and his friendsMr. Wilson stating that, for himself and his friends, they wished to have nothing to do with any part of the series, and therefore moved the reconsideration; which prevailed: Y
le; and, therefore, to the maintenance of the existing Union and Constitution should be directed all the energies of all the departments of the Government, and the efforts of all good citizens. The vote was now taken on this substitute, which was adopted, as follows: Yeas.--Messrs. Anthony, Baker, Bingham, Cameron, Chandler, Clark, Collamer, Dixon, Doolittle, Durkee, Fessenden, Foot, Foster, Grimes, Hale, Harlan, King, Seward, Simmons, Sumner, Ten Eyck, Trumbull, Wade, Wilkinson, and Wilson-25 [all Republicans]. Nays.--Messrs. Bayard, Bigler, Bragg, Bright, Clingman, Crittenden, Fitch, Green, Gwin, Hunter, Johnson, of Tennessee, Kennedy, Lane, of Oregon, Mason, Nicholson, Pearce, Polk, Powell, Pugh, Rice, Saulsbury, and Sebastian-23 [all Democrats, but two Bell-Conservatives, in italics]. Messrs. Iverson, of Georgia, Benjamin and Slidell, of Louisiana, Hemphill and Wigfall, of Texas, and R. W. Johnson, of Arkansas--who had voted just before against taking up the Kansas b
an, Hunter, Johnson, of Tennessee, Kennedy, Latham, Mason, Morrill, Nicholson, Polk, Pugh, Rice, Sebastian, Ten Eyck, and Thomson-24. Nays--Messrs. Bingham, Chandler, Clark, Doolittle, Durkee, Foot, King, Sumner, Trumbull, Wade, Wilkinson, and Wilson--12. And then the Senate returned to the consideration of the Crittenden proposition, for which Mr. Clark's proposition, already given, See page 382. was again offered as a substitute, and voted down: Yeas 14; Nays 22. Finally, Mr. Critson-7. Nays--Messrs. Bayard, Bigler, Bingham, Bright, Chandler, Clark, Dixon, Fessenden, Foot, Foster, Grimes, Gwin, Hunter, Lane, Latham, Mason, Nicholson, Polk, Pugh, Rice, Sebastian, Sumner, Ten Eyck, Trumbull, Wade, Wigfall, Wilkinson, and Wilson--28. So the Senate, by four to one, disposed of the scheme of the Peace Commissioners, and proceeded to vote, directly thereafter, on Mr. Crittenden's original proposition, which was defeated-Yeas 19, Nays 20-as has been stated. The procee
Ind., Lane, of Kansas, McDougall, Morrill, Pomeroy, Sherman, Sumner, Ten Eyck, Wade, Willey, and Wilson--30. The original amendment was then rejected, so as to strike out all these declaratory pros, Latham, Morrill, Nesmith, Pomeroy, Saulsbury, Sherman, Ten Eyck, Wade, Wilkinson, Willey, and Wilson-30. Nays--Messrs. Breckinridge, Johnson, of Mo., Polk, Powell, Trumbull--5. This day, thene, of Ind., Lane, of Kansas, McDougall, Sherman, Simmons, Sumner, Ten Eyck, Trumbull, Wade, and Wilson--24. Nays--Messrs. Breckinridge, Bright, Carlile, Cowan, Johnson, of Mo., Latham, Pearce, Polsas, McDougall, Morrill, Rice, Sherman, Sumner, Ten Eyck, Trumbull, Wade, Wilkinson, Wilmot, and Wilson--29. The bill increasing the pay of soldiers being that day under consideration, Mr. Wilson,Mr. Wilson, of Mass., moved to add the following: And be it further enacted, That all the acts, proclamations, and orders of the President of the United States, after the 4th of March, 1861, respecting the A
nch columbiad, was spiked, and sunk with her. All was the work of a quarter of an hour, during which our side had 3 killed and 12 wounded. As the Judah lay directly off the Navy Yard, where a thousand Rebels were quartered, this was one of the most daring and well-executed achievements of the year. Finally, during the intensely dark night of Oct. 9th, a Confederate force crossed silently from Pensacola to Santa Rosa Island, with intent to surprise and destroy the camp of the 6th New York (Wilson's Zouaves), some two miles distant from Fort Pickens. The attack was well planned and well made. The surprise seems to have been complete. The Zouaves were instantly driven from their camp, which was thoroughly destroyed; but the darkness, which had favored the surprise, invested every step beyond the camp with unknown perils; and, when day broke, the Rebels had no choice but to retreat as swiftly as possible to their boats, eight miles distant. Of course, they were followed, and harassed
n, 250. Bradley, Dr., of Plymouth, Mass., 125. Bragg, Gen. Braxton, his order as to Fort Pickens, 436; 601; attacks Wilson's Zouaves, etc., 602. Braine, Lieut., commanding the Monticello, 601. branch, Adjt., (Rebel,) killed at Bull Run, 5n adhesion to the South, 439-9. Shadrack, a fugitive slave, 215. Shambaugh, Isaac N., on Missouri, 590. Shannon, Wilson, of Ohio. appointed Governor of Kansas. 240; his speech at Westport, Mo., 240; 242; calls out 5,000 men to reduce Lawreniams, Euphemia, the case of, 216. Williams, Col. John S., at Piketon, Ky., 616. Wilmot, David, of Pa., 189; 319. Wilson, Senator, of Mass., 309; 571-2. Wilson's Zouaves, at Santa Rosa Island, 602. Wilson's Creek, battle of, 578 to 582.Wilson's Zouaves, at Santa Rosa Island, 602. Wilson's Creek, battle of, 578 to 582. Winthrop, Major Theo., killed at Bethel, 531. Winchester Virginian, The, J. M. Mason to, 478-9. Wise, Henry A., his prescription for Abolitionists, 128; 144; 146; his speech in the House, 1842, 158; opinion of John Brown, 293; 294; 329; com