hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 146 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 41 5 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 40 2 Browse Search
John Beatty, The Citizen-Soldier; or, Memoirs of a Volunteer 37 13 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 27 9 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 26 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 24 0 Browse Search
A. J. Bennett, private , First Massachusetts Light Battery, The story of the First Massachusetts Light Battery , attached to the Sixth Army Corps : glance at events in the armies of the Potomac and Shenandoah, from the summer of 1861 to the autumn of 1864. 23 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 7, 1862., [Electronic resource] 16 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 16 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Women and Men. You can also browse the collection for Wilson or search for Wilson in all documents.

Your search returned 1 result in 1 document section:

Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Women and Men, I. Introductory. (search)
n the chin, as it lends to the face dignity and paternal majesty. All this in a single paragraph of his series of discourses known as the Instructor, and he afterwards sends tile two sexes, thus impartially instructed, to church together. Women and men are to go to church decently attired, with natural step, embracing silence, possessing unfeigned love, pure in body, pure in heart, fit to pray to God. And again he says in a passage often quoted, The virtue of man and woman is the same. Wilson's translation, I., 121, 318, 328. It was long after the days of Clement of Alexandria when it became a common thing to unite the two sexes for the purpose even of scolding them conjointly. Gradually the habit arose of putting these admonitions into little twin volumes, always kept carefully apart. The duties of men and women travelled, so to speak, on the same conveyance and with equal accommodations, but in separate cars or distinct cabins, and always, as in our own travelling arrange