Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for James Wilson or search for James Wilson in all documents.

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, do.; Andrew McCleary, Acting Master's mate, not seriously; Owen Doherty, coal-heaver, mortally; Frederick W. Johnson, first-class boy, not seriously. Port Royal.--Wounded: George Morris, Commander, flesh wound of right leg. Naugatuck.--James Wilson, musket-shot, not serious; Peter Dixon, not seriously. Lieutenant Constable's letters: letter to his mother. United States gunboat E. A. Stevens, Hampton roads, May 18. my dear mother: I have to thank God for a life preserved under head by some part of the gun or carriage, (I think it was one of the large rubbers,) which stunned me for a moment, although I was able to keep the deck and superintend the fighting of our broadside guns, (which were well handled under charge of Wilson,) until the squadron fell back for want of ammunition, about an hour and a half after our gun burst. After heaving up our anchor I fainted away; but after being cupped behind the ears by the surgeon of the Aroostook, who came on board to look ou
ver, when we were halted and again thrown in line of battle, after burning the bridge over the north branch. At this time the battery was placed on our right and again commenced throwing shells into the lines of the rebels. The rebel artillery had been placed in position opposite to us on the banks of the south branch and threw a number of shell into our midst. While this was going on, I noticed the rebel infantry coming up the railroad and were fording the north branch. I remarked to Major Wilson who, at this time, had not noticed it, that if we did not look out they would flank us on the left. He rode down the line and we were brought to a right face, with our left in front, and ordered to march up the turnpike, allowing the battery to get in front. We had marched but a short distance when the New-York cavalry, who were covering our retreat, were over-powered and driven into our lines by about two thousand rebel cavalry, on a bold charge, flanking us right and left. They close
sick-bed, joined his command, and, though unable to ride his horse, remained with his regiment, travelling in an ambulance until the pursuit was abandoned. I must not fail to mention the renewed obligations under which I rest to my Adjutant, James Wilson, who, during the whole time of the battle and pursuit, was tireless in the discharge of every duty — always at his post, always brave, always reliable. Lieut. Lanstrum, of the Fifteenth Iowa, who acted as aid, deported himself as a good andit upon themselves and their commands. Capt. Holmes, on account of a wound received in the battle of Fort Donelson, was unable to take command of his company during the engagement. Conspicuous for bravery were Lieuts. Parker, Duffield, Marsh, Wilson, Tisdale, Suiter, Hawill, Hall, Blake, Duckworth, Ballinger, Twombley, and McCord. After Lieuts. Parker and Twombley, of company F, were wounded, Sergt. James Ferry took charge of the company and displayed marked efficiency and courage. Likewis
sick-bed, joined his command, and, though unable to ride his horse, remained with his regiment, travelling in an ambulance until the pursuit was abandoned. I must not fail to mention the renewed obligations under which I rest to my Adjutant, James Wilson, who, during the whole time of the battle and pursuit, was tireless in the discharge of every duty — always at his post, always brave, always reliable. Lieut. Lanstrum, of the Fifteenth Iowa, who acted as aid, deported himself as a good andit upon themselves and their commands. Capt. Holmes, on account of a wound received in the battle of Fort Donelson, was unable to take command of his company during the engagement. Conspicuous for bravery were Lieuts. Parker, Duffield, Marsh, Wilson, Tisdale, Suiter, Hawill, Hall, Blake, Duckworth, Ballinger, Twombley, and McCord. After Lieuts. Parker and Twombley, of company F, were wounded, Sergt. James Ferry took charge of the company and displayed marked efficiency and courage. Likewis