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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 46 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 1 1 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for R. C. Wilson or search for R. C. Wilson in all documents.

Your search returned 24 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 95 (search)
quickly over to the right to reinforce Lomax. Wilson's division of cavalry had massed in his front ooking to the southeast I could distinctly see Wilson's division of cavalry. Why this great body ofet in that manoeuvre Ramseur had held in check Wilson's division, and my little brigade was the only charged with his squadron, backed by Lieutenant R. C. Wilson, of the Second Virginia, with his, anne, and our little handful was in full view of Wilson's division, now crossing in force. Wickham ha he sent this dispatch (Sheridan to Grant). Gen. Wilson's cavalry division charged the enemy at Froigades of the First Cavalry Division, with General Wilson's division, to follow the enemy up the LurLuray Valley with the divisions of Merritt and Wilson, excepting Devins's brigade of Merritt's divis to a point opposite McCoy's Ford. On the 23d Wilson crossed McCoy's Ford, and Merritt went back tho, with a battery, had fallen back in front of Wilson's command to the mouth of the tunnel. Their p[4 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Retreat up the Luray Valley. (search)
infantry had fixed the fords for their use. At early dawn Wilson's division moved up the Winchester pike and made a dash atrepulsed; indeed, the pickets kept up such a fusilade that Wilson dismounted a considerable force and tried to drive them ofrst Virginia, charged with his squadron, backed by Lieutenant R. C. Wilson, of the Second Virginia, with his, and scattered te fog was gone, and our little handful was in full view of Wilson's division, now crossing in force. Wickham had come up ant of the 21st he sent this dispatch (Sheridan to Grant). Gen. Wilson's cavalry division charged the enemy at Front Royal pikeected two brigades of the First Cavalry Division, with General Wilson's division, to follow the enemy up the Luray valley anal into the Luray Valley with the divisions of Merritt and Wilson, excepting Devins's brigade of Merritt's division, which h to withdraw to a point opposite McCoy's Ford. On the 23d Wilson crossed McCoy's Ford, and Merritt went back through Front
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Fight at Waynesboroa. (search)
om that gun had about the same effect that a stick in the hands of a mischievous boy, near enough to stir up a nest of wasps, would have had: they swarmed out and very soon were ready for us. Moving over to the Staunton pike, we soon learned that Wilson's division and Lowell's brigade had been sent to Staunton and Waynesboroa to destroy the iron railroad bridge at the latter place. General Wickham ordered me to move with my brigade to Waynesboroa and attack, saying General Pegram's brigade woulf a mile from the mouth of the tunnel through the mountain, and between it and the railroad bridge, upon which the enemy were at work. Two companies of boys and reserves from Staunton and Waynesboro, with a battery, had fallen back in front of Wilson's command to the mouth of the tunnel. Their pieces had been withdrawn to the top of the mountain. I sent a scout forward, who cut off the enemy's vidette and captured it. We had to wait a little time for our artillery to come up. The blind road