hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 3 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for William S. Wilson or search for William S. Wilson in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

As I was present during the entire battle, I feel that I am pretty well posted. There was a simultaneous attack from every street and lane leading into the town. We were fired upon with shot and shell on the west, and musketry from the north, east and south. Our forces were under command of Lieut.-Col. J. J. Landrum and Major William O. Smith, who showed energy and courage. Among those who manifested bravery and determination, were Col. Landrum, Major Smith, Capt. Robert Scott, Capt. W. S. Wilson, and Capt. McClintock. Up to this time we have found twenty-seven Federals dead and nineteen rebels. The next day succeeding the battle, Morgan, with his band of yelling hounds, left this place, bound southward to Paris, bearing away the majority of his wounded. He left eighteen in care of our surgeons, several of them supposed to be mortally wounded. I send our list of wounded: Captain Rogers, Eighteenth Kentucky, leg, slightly. T. S. Duvall, arm amputated. H. Reed,
oldiers in the ranks. Major Hart, commanding the forces, behaved with coolness and gallantry. Capt. McConnell handled his men excellently, and behaved himself with marked bravery. Capts. Carlin and Le Blond were at their posts and bore themselves like true soldiers as they are. Sergt.-Major McConnell, acting Adjutant, seized a musket and fought nobly. The sutler, George Steele, fired nine rounds. Mr. Pelton, his clerk, was in manfully. W. G. Nichols, Quartermaster's Sergeant, and William S. Wilson, Quartermaster's Clerk, with Enfield rifles in hand, did excellent service. And so did Geo. B. Frye, regimental post-master, and Ben. Hamilton, Adjutant's Clerk, using their Enfields with steadiness and accuracy. I name these gentlemen because they are regarded in the army as non-combatants, and yet in the hour of need were not found wanting. Our entire number in ranks during the engagement was one hundred and fifty-five, against seven hundred and eighty-five, according to Col. Wood