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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 4 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 3 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
John D. Billings, The history of the Tenth Massachusetts battery of light artillery in the war of the rebellion 1 1 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 1 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 1 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 1 1 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865. You can also browse the collection for Win or search for Win in all documents.

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r-General John Brown and Brigadier-Generals Canty, Manigault, Quarles, Cockerell, and Scott. Our aggregate loss amounted to 4500. See General Hood's telegram to General Beauregard, in Appendix. See also his report. It was a hard-fought battle, but, withal, a barren Confederate victory. On the 30th of November, in response to his telegram of the 24th, General Beauregard received the following letter from President Davis: Richmond, Nov. 30th, 1864. General Beauregard, care of Colonel Win. Brown: Yours of the 24th received. It is probable that the enemy, if short of supplies, may move directly for the coast. When that is made manifest you will be able to concentrate your forces upon the one object, and I hope, if you cannot defeat his attempt, that you may reduce his army to such condition as to be ineffective for further operations. Until Hood reaches the country proper of the enemy he can scarcely change the plans for Sherman's or Grant's campaigns. They would, I