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Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Winder, John Henry 1800-1865 (search)
Winder, John Henry 1800-1865 Military officer; born in Maryland in 1800; graduated at the United States Military Academy in 1820; promoted captain of the 1st Artillery in October, 1842; served in the Mexican War, winning distinction at Contreras, Churubusco, Chapultepec, and the fall of the city of Mexico; promoted major in November, 1860; resigned in the following April and joined the Confederate army, in which he was appointed a brigadiergeneral and given command of Richmond, having under his charge Belle Isle and Libby prison. Later he was placed in command of the Andersonville prison, Ga. He died in Branchville, S. C., Feb. 9, 1865. See Confederate prisons.
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), The civil history of the Confederate States (search)
ught it better to feed them than to fight them. The total number of prisoners in this prison of 1864 appears to have been increased about as follows: In April, 10,000; May, 18,000; June, 26,000; July, 31,000; August, 31,000. After this date the number was suddenly decreased to 8,000 in September, and to 4,000 in October, by the removal of all the prisoners except invalids and nurses to Millen in the eastern part of Georgia. This change was made in consequence partly of the advice of General Winder, and also because of a threatened raid from Sherman's army then at Atlanta. The deaths during five months from March 1st to August 1st, were only 4,485, about ten per cent. But on the occurring of a pestilence in the form of dysentery, scurvy and gangrene, the deaths increased greatly during the months of August, September and October. In consequence of the dangerous nature of the diseases appearing in the camp the Confederate government directed the above stated removal of at least 20
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical: officers of civil and military organizations. (search)
and made chief of the bureau of ordnance and hydrography, and continued to render important services until the close of the war. Soon afterward he was appointed to a professorship in the Virginia military institute, which he still holds. John Henry Winder John Henry Winder, provost marshal general, was born in Maryland in 1800, son of General W. H. Winder, a soldier of the war of 1812. He was graduated at the United States military academy in 1820; served at Fort McHenry and on the FloriJohn Henry Winder, provost marshal general, was born in Maryland in 1800, son of General W. H. Winder, a soldier of the war of 1812. He was graduated at the United States military academy in 1820; served at Fort McHenry and on the Florida frontier; resigned in August, 1823; was reappointed with rank of secondlieu-tenant of artillery, 1827; was promoted first-lieutenant, 1833; served in the Florida war; was promoted captain, 1842; served in the Mexican war at La Hoya, Ocalaca, Contreras, Churubusco, Chapultepec and City of Mexico; was brevetted major and lieutenant-colonel for gallantry; promoted major November 22, 1860; resigned April 27, 1861. He entered the Confederate service, was made brigadier-general and given command