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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 76 2 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 65 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 44 6 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 39 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 24 0 Browse Search
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 15 1 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 15 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 10 0 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 10 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for John A. Winslow or search for John A. Winslow in all documents.

Your search returned 34 results in 3 document sections:

Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 10: naval engagement at South-West pass.--the Gulf blockading squadron in November, 1861. (search)
coming in that guise, stated that he had abandoned his ship in obedience to signal, and on being informed that no such signal had been made, he insisted that Captain Winslow of the Water Witch had so read it. When Captain Winslow was asked regarding the matter, he said that he saw no such signal. It was, in fact, simply the poCaptain Winslow was asked regarding the matter, he said that he saw no such signal. It was, in fact, simply the power of imagination acting on Capt. Handy's nerves. He did send to Capt. Winslow asking if that was not the meaning of a signal that was made by the flagship, but the answer he received was No; it is impossible that any such signal can have been made. Get your guns out of your stern ports and defend your ship. It appears thatCapt. Winslow asking if that was not the meaning of a signal that was made by the flagship, but the answer he received was No; it is impossible that any such signal can have been made. Get your guns out of your stern ports and defend your ship. It appears that on leaving his ship Capt. Handy determined that nothing of her should fall into the hands of Commodore Hollins, and he therefore ordered that a slow match should be placed near the magazine, and a train of powder laid, so that by the time he reached the Richmond the old Vincennes, that had performed many a useful cruise, should go
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 32: Navy Department.--energies displayed.--building of iron-clads (search)
hat at one time bade defiance to France and England, who, in consequence, let us alone to work out our own destiny. Among others who were in favor of building up an iron-clad navy were citizens whose names should ever be remembered. At the time when the greatest opposition was being manifested against Ericsson's invention, and the government would only authorize the construction of the first Monitor on a guarantee that she should prove a success in battle, John A. Griswold, Bushnell and Winslow. and Erastus Corning, came forward to the inventor's assistance, and it was mainly due to the capital furnished by these gentlemen that the Monitor was ready in time to meet the Merrimac. It is thus seen that, although there was a want of liberality in Congress, our private citizens were more generous, and would not let an invention which common-sense told them was invaluable, be lost for want of money, even though they ran the risk of losing all that they ventured. Men frequently occu
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., chapter 48 (search)
terwards the U. S. steamer Kearsarge, Captain John A. Winslow, steamed into port, communicated withke it Captain (afterwards Rear-Admiral) John A. Winslow. appear that the Kearsarge had the advantwas safe on board the Deerhound, fearing that Winslow would demand his surrender, urged his friend,mplained. As to the implied censure on Captain Winslow for not pursuing the Deerhound and recovehis prisoners, the question arises: Were they Winslow's prisoners at all, any more than if they hadf the North were overjoyed when they read Captain Winslow's modest dispatch announcing the destructy, her acts had been denounced as piratical. Winslow pursued the only course proper for him: he we not escape. Captain Semmes' notification to Winslow, that lie would give him battle in a day or te latter would wait, was hardly necessary, as Winslow had not the slightest idea of avoiding a contchinson. Steam-Sloop Kearsarge. Captain, John A. Winslow: Lieutenant-Commander, James S. Thorn[20 more...]