Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for Nathan Winslow or search for Nathan Winslow in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 1: re-formation and Reanimation.—1841. (search)
even he had to denounce, forced the Mass. Abolition Society to make a shift of securing Mr. Wright's services as editor once more in June, 1841 (Lib. 11.99). He was succeeded by Leavitt as above, and the paper became the Emancipator and Free American (Lib. 11: 191, 203). In 1842 Mr. Wright, in a desperate struggle with poverty, was trying personally to find purchasers for his translation (Lib. 12: 127). Phelps is a city missionary, and on the most amicable terms with Hubbard Lib. 12.127. Winslow, George W. Blagden, et id., etc. Torrey is engaged in vilifying the old anti-slavery organization and its friends, and manufacturing political moonshine for a third party. In June, 1841, Mr. Torrey was active in forming in Boston a Vigilance Committee against kidnapping and for the prompt assistance of fugitives closely pursued by their owners (Lib. 11: 94). In December he went to Washington as a newspaper correspondent (Lib. 12: 10; Memoir of C. T. Torrey, p. 87). Those who are curious
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 11: George Thompson, M. P.—1851. (search)
t pass over the speech of Henry Wilson, the Lib. 21.19. then President of the Massachusetts Senate, the future Vice-President of the United States—a twelve-years' 1873-1875. reader of the Liberator, acknowledging his debt of gratitude to Mr. Garrison for his own love of liberty and regard for the rights of man over all the globe; pass, too, over Theodore Parker's eulogium, and the kindred strains Lib. 21.19. of many others, both clergymen and laymen. Charles List, A son-in-law of Nathan Winslow. His widow was re-married to S. E. Sewall. a Boston lawyer, Secretary of the Vigilance Committee, said: The history of liberty, as it will be read a thousand years Lib. 21.23. hence, has not been begun. Now I wish to ask for a contribution to this history which will be the most valuable that can be made now, and probably during some centuries to come. The enjoyment which we have experienced this evening, has arisen in a great measure from the presence of our distinguished gues